Search Results: "David A. Johnson"


BOOK REVIEW

SNOW SOUNDS by David A. Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2006

"A wonderful introduction to the world of poetic language. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It's December 23, and a young boy is sleeping. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD by David A. Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Notwithstanding Johnson's strong stylistic ties to illustrators such as Randolph Caldecott and E. Boyd Smith, adults are the likeliest audience for this volume. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Although fine lines and a low contrast palette give Johnson's paintings a faded, smudgy look, he effectively captures the classic nursery rhyme's flavor, decking the matronly Mother Hubbard out in sweeping 19th-century gowns that are ruffled, fur- trimmed and elaborately accessorized, then dispatching her to a series of elegantly appointed shops and stalls for goods to lavish on her pampered canine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WACKIEST WHITE HOUSE PETS by Gibbs Davis
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

Opening with the arguable notion that "pets make a house a home," Davis identifies 15 unusual members of the sizeable menagerie (about 400 strong, so far) that presidents or their families have kept. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALL ME MARIANNE by Jen Bryant
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Though a sample of poetry would have made a better sendoff than Bryant's biographical afterword, this does provide a tantalizing glimpse into one writer's creative process. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A Brooklyn lad finds common ground with an oddly dressed lady in this fictional but not unlikely zoo encounter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON SAND ISLAND by Jacqueline Briggs Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2003

"Thoughtful readers will appreciate this low-key tribute to a child's determination, and to the mutual respect that binds a community together. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The author of Snowflake Bentley (1998) and the illustrator of Amy Cohn's Abraham Lincoln (2002) team up for an atmospheric picture of fishing village life on an island in Lake Superior several generations ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABRAHAM LINCOLN by Amy L. Cohn
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A timeline is appended, but there are neither source notes nor suggestions for further reading. (Picture book/biography. 7-11)"
"See that tall, tall man in the tall black hat? Know who he is? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELEPHANT SEALS by Sylvia A. Johnson
Released: Jan. 2, 1989

The northern seals with trunk-like proboscises were nearly extinct in 1800 but now number over 100,000, with populations making their homes on the Pacific coasts of Mexico and California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAPPING THE WORLD by Sylvia A. Johnson
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Accessible, beautiful, and informative, this is essential for most collections. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
From the oldest maps in the world, to mapping the earth and other planets from space, Johnson (Ferrets, 1997, etc.) introduces the world of cartography using an outstanding collection of full-color period prints and contemporary photographs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 15, 2000

"A fascinating look at ordinary life, terror, and persecution during the Holocaust."
Following on the heels of the groundbreaking scholarship of Daniel Jonah Goldhagen and Christopher Browning, Johnson (History/Central Michigan Univ.; Urbanization and Crime, not reviewed, etc.) takes a chilling look at what motivated the German people to pursue the course of the war and the Holocaust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 22, 2015

"A surprisingly winning long-distance love story."
The story of a Christian relationship, revealed in a series of letters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FERRETS by Sylvia A. Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 1997

"A section on the black-footed ferret, a wild cousin, is also included. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
These non-rodent relatives of the weasel, badger, and skunk, often the source of controversy over their appropriateness as house pets, are gaining in popularity, next in line to cats and dogs. Read full book review >