Search Results: "David Brin"


BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILN PEOPLE by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Intricate plotting, unflagging inventiveness, and a judicious sprinkling of puns and in-jokes: Brin keeps the pages feverishly turning and the tone light enough to evade the inherent irrationality of the premise."
Brin (Foundation's Triumph, 1999, etc.) gives the medieval fable of the golem a thoroughgoing, agreeably tongue-in-cheek revamp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Brin's writing is eclectic, wandering and fun. Some of what he says is, well, crackpot. But Brin is also no anarchistic dreamer, no 'cypher punk,' as he puts it. The transparent, unregulated future of freedom is only a possibility, a result of long processes of experimentation and gained wisdom."
Self-described crackpot and prolific science-fiction writer Brin (Infinity's Shore, 1996, etc.) ponders the technological threats to and possibilities for freedom in the not-too-distant future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Typical Brin (Glory Season, 1993, etc.): tremendously inventive, ambitious work undercut by excess verbiage, one- dimensional characters, and drably unevocative writing."
The first (not self-contained) part of a projected far-future trilogy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOUNDATION'S TRIUMPH by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 1999

"Still, readers of the first two volumes, and fans of Asimov's original yarns come to that, will want to explore."
Extending the late Isaac Asimov's original Foundation Trilogy, this Second has each entry tackled by a different author (previously Gregory Benford's Foundation's Fear, 1997, and Greg Bear's Foundation and Chaos, not seen). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEAVEN'S REACH by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 8, 1998

"Since Brin wrote the charming and inspiring The Postman (1985), his novels have grown ever more impenetrable and overambitious; like the rest of the trilogy, this one's hard to get into, hard to follow, and difficult to care about."
Final installment—the individual entries (Brightness Reef, 1995; Infinity's Shore, 1996) aren't particularly intelligible in their own right—of Brin's vast yarn about planet Jijo and its six alien races, all illegal immigrants living in terror of a visitation from the rulers of the Five Galaxies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXISTENCE by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2012

"A verbose, unwieldy, frustrating, nugget-strewn mess."
Huge, ambitious concoction from the author of Kiln People (2002, etc.) that tackles the question of why we haven't yet been contacted by aliens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INFINITY'S SHORE by David Brin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"Indistinguishable characters, wildly overcomplicated plotting, and cluttered backdrop: as before, a combination utterly unintelligible to newcomers, and a tough slog even for series fans."
Book Two (Brightness Reef, 1995) of ``a new Uplift trilogy,'' so-called because both old and new trilogies describe how advanced Galactic races ``uplift'' younger, lesser races into full sentience and membership in the Galactic community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLORY SEASON by David Brin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 17, 1993

"Brin simply has overreached himself."
Upheaval and strife in a far-future feminist utopia, thoughtfully set forth by the author of The Postman (1985), Earth (1990), etc. On planet Stratos, long isolated from the Human Phylum, women are dominant politically, numerically, and sexually; the most successful women clone themselves to create extended aristocratic families. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE by Paul Trynka
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2011

"Bowie nerds will love it, and music nerds will admire it; regular nerds and most others will think it's about 150 pages too long."
Everything you always wanted to know about the Thin White Duke. Everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID LYNCH by Dennis Lim
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A streamlined and breezily engaging—but impressively rigorous—evaluation of a unique film talent; essential reading for fans of Lynch and the immersive, elusive worlds he creates."
The director of programming at the Film Society of Lincoln Center delivers a short, sharp reckoning with the dangerous visions of celebrated filmmaker David Lynch. Read full book review >