Search Results: "David Cannadine"


BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY IN OUR TIME by David Cannadine
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Entertaining and enlightening."
Short, occasional pieces that are best ingested in small bites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 3, 2003

"A few stale chocolates in an otherwise luscious sampler."
Veteran English historian Cannadine (Ornamentalism: How the British Saw Their Empire, 2001, etc.) ranges freely over an eclectic selection of topics, from the design of the palace of Westminster to the differences between the cinematic and literary versions of James Bond—and, yes, the legendary PM and Nobel laureate somehow figures in them all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RISE AND FALL OF CLASS IN BRITAIN by David Cannadine
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 1999

"Thankfully, his enlightening book is neither."
An original contribution to an old topic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A controversial work that is sure to spark debate—and a painstaking and temperate argument, written with a good command of the facts and a remarkable sense of proportion."
A fresh perspective on British history, in which Cannadine (The Rise and Fall of Class in Britain, 1999, etc.) argues against racial interpretations of colonialism and maintains that the British Empire was sustained by a universal respect for social class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 26, 1993

A well-written if not wholly successful effort to revive the reputation of G.M. Trevelyan as a historian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELLON by David Cannadine
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 2006

"Grand successes and epic failures, engrossingly recounted."
Lavish, multifaceted portrait of the early-20th-century American business titan, emphasizing the man rather than the money. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2013

"A generally persuasive, impassioned book-length essay. While his conclusions (and language) sometimes grow repetitive, they nonetheless serve to underscore at every turn an incisive argument buttressed by millennia of evidence."
Historian and editor Cannadine (History/Princeton Univ.; Mellon, 2006, etc.) constructs a stirring critique of history that questions conventional approaches to narrating the human chronicle. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BLOG POST

LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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BLOG POST

A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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