Search Results: "David Cunningham"


BOOK REVIEW

A CROW'S JOURNEY by David Cunningham
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Wonderful for its own sake, Cunningham's work will also enrich a study of the water cycle. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4+)"
The creator of the exquisite Nightfall, Country Lake (1995) has produced another poetic set of observations of the natural world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHTFALL, COUNTRY LAKE by David Cunningham
Released: March 1, 1995

"Cunningham's first solo effort is an unqualified success—this masterful production is a reminder that now and then, less really is more. (Picture book. 2+)"
In 24 carefully chosen words and 14 eloquently modulated pastel illustrations, readers follow a small boy from that moment on a late summer afternoon when the breeze dies, through ruddy sunset and misty twilight, until he falls asleep to the sound of crickets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 2012

"An interesting academic study that labors to understand Klan members from inside their heads, while making it clear that the author abhors what the organization stood for."
Cunningham (Sociology/Brandeis Univ.; There's Something Happening Here: The New Left, the Klan, and FBI Counterintelligence, 2004) digs deeply into the relatively recent history of the white supremacist group. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MEMORY BOX by Mary Bahr
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1992

"Upbeat, but also sensible and perceptive. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When Zach comes for his annual vacation, Gramps has just learned that he has Alzheimer's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"The illustrations are compelling throughout, but the narrative is more powerful when it is more personal and specific."
An illustrated primer on mental illness that builds to personal revelation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"A small potpourri, but with more substance than most in this format."
Some interesting exchanges and provocative observations arise from these interviews with nine prominent broadcast journalists and one politician about presidential campaigns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TREASURE IS THE ROSE by Julia Cunningham
Released: Oct. 15, 1973

"Cunningham's heavy romanticism is a little easier to take than the drippy sentimentality of her recent Tallow stories, but as usual her talent for simulating a trance exceeds her sensibility, so that from the opening disclaimer that 'To tell about Ariane is to try to grow a rose on paper without the touch of sun and moon, rain and snow that make it real and growing,' she comes as dose to parody as she does to sharing a vision."
In a crumbling 11th century castle hedged with roses, the power of a young widow's gentleness tames a trio of thugs and repels a haughty baron. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINGS OF THE MORNING by Julia Cunningham
Released: March 1, 1971

"And, coupled with the poeticizing, ineffectual by comparison with the creative simplicity of the Brown-Charlip Dead Bird."
Adumbrated in words that are not childlike is an experience unlike that of most children — who, finding an inert bird by the roadside, assume it to be hurt or dead and react fearfully or protectively according to their nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Legend of Queen Agatha by Sam Cunningham
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 18, 2014

"Astute lessons in government enliven this less than compelling tale of a wise, disciplined queen known for her beneficence."
An aristocrat's daughter becomes queen in this insightful if somewhat bland fantasy from debut author Cunningham. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BY NIGHTFALL by Michael Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"'Does America get the art it deserves?' wonders Peter. Or the novel?"
A surfeit of literary and cultural references can't disguise a lightweight soap opera. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAYBE, A MOLE by Julia Cunningham
Released: Nov. 18, 1974

"Suck is the nature of the cozy, unilluminating glow that Cunningham has been casting from Candle Tales (1964) to The Treasure Is the Rose (1973) — despite more than a hint of stronger fires in Dorp Dead."
This is another of Cunningham's sentimental stories told in that half-cute, half-hushed manner that reeks with serf-importance and the expectation of an awed reception. Read full book review >