Search Results: "David E. Sanger"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 2012

"A must-read for policy wonks and a good primer on how American power works beyond our borders."
A bracing rejoinder to those who think Barack Obama is a wimp, to say nothing of anti-American. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POPULATION by David E. Newton
NONFICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Source notes; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
An impressively well-balanced account of a life-or-death issue: Is each new person an asset or a liability to life on earth? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAGGAGE CLAIM by David E. Talbert
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Serenely silly and insubstantial. Pablum, packaged for quick sale as soul food. Don't bite."
An unmarried flight attendant's frantic search for the perfect man takes center stage, in this frothy debut from playwright Talbert (Love Makes Things Happen; Mr. Right Now!, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Death Watch Beetle by David E. Huntley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 2013

"A refreshingly earnest adventure that honors the work of World War II-era codebreakers."
An old-fashioned espionage yarn involving crafty coded messages, set against a post-World War II milieu buzzing with Soviet spies, fugitive Nazis and UFO sightings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A flimsy frame for some bright polar portraits. (Photos—color and b&w—not seen.)"
Uneven mix of travelogue and polar history, as Fisher (Environmental Sciences/Univ. of Miami; Hostage One, 1989, etc.) sails on the first surface vessel to reach the North Pole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 4, 2013

"Enriched with historical references ranging from Pasteur to de Tocqueville, this is an accessible, if at times exhaustively detailed, work valuable for its reportage of incidents that have remained largely unknown to the average citizen."
A blogger and advocate journalist stacks the deck against the government's over-regulation of food, employing salient stories of individuals "entangled in the enforcement crackdown" amid their efforts to provide nutrient-dense products, including raw milk and fermented foods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A brilliantly reported, if occasionally repetitive, account of geopolitical rivalry as a blood sport. (Eight-page photo insert— not seen.)"
A stranger-than-fiction thriller that puts the bitter conflict between the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan into clear, human perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIVING IN THE CHILDREN OF GOD by David E. Van Zandt
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1991

"Mo letter'' reproduced in an appendix has a lot more punch. (Nine halftones—not seen.)"
A curious volume about the cult known as the Children of God, from Van Zandt, a sociologist (Law/Northeastern) who infiltrated a British branch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEALTH
Released: Nov. 26, 1993

"Glossary; further reading (including some middle-grade fiction); resources; index. (Nonfiction. 9+)"
Addressing himself to young people like the patients he advises (and suggesting that if his simple text is too difficult, a parent can share it aloud), a pediatrician discusses the nature of learning disabilities, describes the several types, offers specific strategies for compensation and remediation, and issues a sympathetic but no-nonsense pep-talk: a good attitude and self- esteem are all-important; gains can be made, but there will be difficulties, and perseverance is essential. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AIDS ISSUES by David E. Newton
HEALTH
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Notes; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
The purpose here, well-accomplished, differs from most AIDS books: Newton explores social, political, economic, and ethical issues; trends and science information emerge in these contexts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 2009

"A compendium of discomfiting, implication-heavy facts, of particular interest to students of geopolitics."
Stanley Kubrick got it wrong in Dr. Strangelove: There was a Doomsday Machine, but it was in the other bunker. Read full book review >