Search Results: "David E. Van Zandt"


BOOK REVIEW

LIVING IN THE CHILDREN OF GOD by David E. Van Zandt
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1991

"Mo letter'' reproduced in an appendix has a lot more punch. (Nine halftones—not seen.)"
A curious volume about the cult known as the Children of God, from Van Zandt, a sociologist (Law/Northeastern) who infiltrated a British branch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 7, 2006

"A few exotic adventures, some tense moments, lots of redundant reflections."
Triumphs and tragedies in the career of a former FBI agent who became one of the Bureau's first hostage-negotiation specialists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE by Paul Trynka
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2011

"Bowie nerds will love it, and music nerds will admire it; regular nerds and most others will think it's about 150 pages too long."
Everything you always wanted to know about the Thin White Duke. Everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Van Ripplewink by Paul Clayton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 2016

"A serious novel with an amusing premise."
Clayton (In the Shape of a Man, 2013, etc.) updates the story of Rip Van Winkle in this social novel.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN JOHNSON by Ronald L. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A perfectly pleasant double feature."
The Van Johnson Story. Starring . . . Van Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VAN by John Ball
Released: March 22, 1989

Ball's final novel (he died last October) is a sorry testament: neither is it one of his popular Virgil Tibbs mysteries (In the Heat of the Night, etc.) nor an addition to his Jack Tallon series, but a lumbering police procedural—loosely based on a real L.A. serial-killer case—saved from amateurism only by tight attention to cop-detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-MAIL by Stephanie D. Fletcher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Long, bland stretches alternate with vulgar, hyperexplicit sexual confessions: a cheap, easy, and convincing glimpse of modern American cybersex—for what that may be worth."
Non-initiates to the communications revolution can now enjoy cyber-romance on the printed page—thanks to this epistolary first novel by a North Carolina writer. Read full book review >