Search Results: "David Ebershoff"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DANISH GIRL by David Ebershoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Gripping, though inconsistently, with Greta more compelling than Lili. And, for those so inclined, a hyperdetailed tour of times long gone."
Ebershoff, executive editor at Random House, tells the story of a man who gets turned into a woman: a leisurely and old-fashioned first novel that will doubtless be riveting to many; others may find it a grandiose canvas for what it actually offers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PASADENA by David Ebershoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 2002

"Lovely, but as exhausting as exhaustive."
An epic tale spanning the history of a WWI-era southern California that's later lost to the flash of Hollywood and technoburbs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE CITY by David Ebershoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Ebershoff (The Danish Girl, 2000) strikes a chord over and again, sure to resonate like soulful music to some and clanking repetition to others."
A well-honed but less-than-striking collection about discontented gay men caught between troubled childhoods, diminished lives, and the shifting winds of their uncertain futures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE 19TH WIFE by David Ebershoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 2008

"Reminiscent of Wallace Stegner's Angle of Repose in scope and ambition, though the narrative sometimes drags."
Ebershoff (Pasadena, 2002, etc.) takes a promising historical premise and runs with it—perhaps a couple of dozen pages too long. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RISE OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT by David Ebershoff
Released: March 30, 1979

"The real lesson, willy-nilly, is in seeing the fun he had being a great, boyish nuisance."
Everything that, in time, made TR an irresistible force the curiosity and concentration, the energy, the ardor, the dramatic flair vitalizes this hugely detailed, over-long (700 pp), and rather florid account of his life up to the presidency. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID BARCLAY MOORE
by Megan Labrise

Readers of all ages, get ready to catch a rising star. David Barclay Moore’s electric debut, The Stars Beneath Our Feet, is a middle-grade must-read as vibrant and variant as the thrumming thoroughfare where it unfolds: Harlem’s 125th Street.

“If Harlem was a human body, then 125th would be its pumping heart, throbbing all the time,” writes Moore, who ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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BLOG POST

A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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BOOK REVIEW

BEATRIX POTTER AND HER PAINTBOX by David McPhail
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Humble and lovely. (Picture book/biography. 3-6)"
A small girl named Beatrix Potter spends her childhood painting. Read full book review >