Search Results: "David G. Hartwell"


BOOK REVIEW

TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY SCIENCE FICTION by David G. Hartwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Grab this book. Whether newcomer or old hand, the reader will not be disappointed."
A bumper crop of 34 stories from authors who first came to prominence in the 21st century, compiled by two of the most highly respected editors in the business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRISTMAS FOREVER by David G. Hartwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Roger Zelazny, Joan Aiken, Gene Wolfe, Charles de Lint, Rudy Rucker, Damon Knight, Alan Dean Foster, Robert Sheckley, Brian Stableford, Michael Bishop), skeptical browsers will be forgiven for regarding somewhat cynically askance a volume whose sole raison d'etre is to cash in on the festivities."
Expect neither old favorites nor unjustly neglected gems: these are 28 all-new tales with a Yuletide flavor, ranging from fairy tales to hard sf, assembled by one of the field's most highly regarded editors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YEAR'S BEST SF 18 by David G. Hartwell
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 10, 2013

"Almost uniformly excellent—but then when was an anthology from Hartwell ever less?"
Award-winning editor/anthologist Hartwell rounds up a sparkling selection of science-fiction stories from 2012. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NORTHERN SUNS by David G. Hartwell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1999

"Pleasingly eclectic and worth a try for story fans."
A companion volume to the 1994 hardcover collection of science fiction stories, Northern Stars (not reviewed), presenting 22 further pieces by Canadian authors—"Canadian" being defined in the loosest possible sense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 1999

"If you considered Australia too remote and sparsely populated to be science fictionally important—well, think again."
Not the first volume of Australian SF (editor Van Iken's rather indiscriminate collection arrived here in 1984) but by far the most significant: 20 substantial tales from the modern era, the majority of whose authors will be familiar to Kirkus regulars and SF-story buffs. A. Bertram Chandler (1912—84) offers an ingenious explanation for why Australian Aborigines revere Ayer's Rock. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIETNAM 1945 by David G. Marr
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"Meticulous and objective, an indispensable document for understanding the roots of American involvement in Vietnam. (32 b&w photos, not seen)"
A winning combination of scholarly tome and readable history, examining the portentous events culminating in the ``August Revolution'' of 1945, when Ho Chi Minh declared the independent Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 5, 2006

"The thick historical detail may amount to overkill for the average reader, but it's a winning hand for the true student of gambling."
Man's unending thirst for the jackpot, from primitive dice games in early antiquity to the current online poker craze. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Swamp Witch by David G. Horton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 2016

"A tale that derives its chills from a moody atmosphere and an unrelenting, unknown antagonist."
An ex-convict gets caught up in a murder investigation in a town full of stories about a local, bloodthirsty witch in Horton's (Small Towns, Country Roads, & Autumn Leaves, 2010) horror yarn.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"Fits nicely alongside Stephen Pyne's The Ice (1986) on the very slim shelf of first-rate Antarctic natural histories."
A glittering, curlicued natural history of Antarctica: Campbell's literary debut and a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award winner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"The cutting edge of AI, and not bad as film criticism either. (color photos, not seen)"
Tributes to Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke's classic film, and discussions concerning how close we are to computers that are as intelligent, as devious, and even as emotional as the infamous HAL. Read full book review >