Search Results: "David Goldin"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2012

"An engaging and enlivening introduction for kids and adults alike. ('Who's Who at the Museum,' glossary, list of works) (Picture book. 4-8)"
True to the subtitle, this book's cover delivers an amusing yet informative tour of an art museum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAXTER, THE PIG WHO WANTED TO BE KOSHER by Laurel Snyder
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 24, 2010

"While Snyder's glossary glides a little irresponsibly over the precise meaning of 'kosher,' this will nevertheless find plenty of use in Jewish homes, particularly among families in which one parent is not Jewish. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
The title says it all: When Baxter hears about Shabbat, when "the candles gleam and glow and dance while our sweetest voices lift in song," from an old man at the bus stop, of course he wants to be part of it—but how? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOST CAT by Tad Hardy
by Tad Hardy, illustrated by David Goldin
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"The artist portrays the cat—rightly, readers will say—as a total rascal; he's garrulous, colossally independent, and immune to all human concerns. (Picture book. 2-7)"
A big, round cat—with a face only a mother (or distraught owner) could love—gets lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DOUBLE LIFE by Nan Goldin
Released: June 1, 1994

"Collectively, the photographs add up to something of a mixture between a (raw, very raw) family album and a photo essay that follows a group of impulsive, charismatic people from the end of the hippy era through the glam-party 1970s and into the age of AIDS."
Two old friends, photographers, survivors of druggy 1970s, and devotees of the drag-queen subculture, Goldin and Armstrong present photographs that summarize the long strange trip they've taken together. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1999

"From tiny, jewel-like title decorations to crowd scenes that ripple with movement, Pinkney's watercolors provide a shimmering backdrop to these reverent, simply told renditions. (bibliography) (Folklore. 8-12)"
This gathering of retold stories from the Talmud and elsewhere features dazzling watercolor art matched to encounters with the Old Testament figure who has become, as Goldin (While the Candles Burn, 1996, etc.) writes, "a symbol of hope, a figure who stands for what is just and good in the world." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 1992

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 8-11)"
A fictional account of the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire in N. Y. C., as seen by Rosie, a young Jewish girl whose older sister escapes but whose cousin does not. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST HANUKKAH EVER by Barbara Diamond Goldin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"The colorful expressive caricature illustrations done in digital media provide an ethnic flavor to this loving family, enhancing the contemporary noodlehead premise which should have readers young and old shaking their heads in mild amusement. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Like the fools of Chelm, the Knoodle family can be a bunch of numbskulls when it comes to giving Hanukkah gifts that "will be treasured forever." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Notes on sources; glossary. (Nonfiction. 5+)"
A lovely book that's intended as a companion to, rather than a substitute for, a Passover Haggadah. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSOVER COWBOY by Barbara Diamond Goldin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"A Seder and cowboy clothes are beautifully woven together. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Russian Jews settle in Argentina—a little-known but timely fact. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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