Search Results: "David Hajdu"


BOOK REVIEW

LOVE FOR SALE by David Hajdu
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A highly learned pleasure for music and pop-culture buffs."
Strolling through the archives of pop music history with an experienced guide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2001

"A strong and vivid portrait of some remarkable characters—and one that manages against the odds to get to the people behind the egos."
Overweening ambition drives this insightful story of the 1950s folk music revival that anticipates the arrival of the 1960s counterculture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 2009

"A gift for readers who enjoy erudition seasoned with élan."
Hajdu (Journalism/Columbia Univ.; The Ten Cent-Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America, 2008) returns with a graceful collection of essays, most previously published, on a variety of topics—jazz mostly, but also Elmer Fudd, Elvis and others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUSH LIFE by David Hajdu
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1996

"A good idea done right."
Hajdu (an editor at Entertainment Weekly) has found a perfect subject in Strayhorn, a little-studied figure central to jazz history, the composer of such famous Ellington-band pieces as ``Chelsea Bridge,'' ``Lush Life,'' and ``Take the A Train.'' ``Strays'' (also known as ``Swee' Pea''), born in 1915, grew up working-class in Pittsburgh and had high-society aspirations from the start: He wrote an entire Gershwin-like musical revue a year out of high school, full of sophisticated recitative and advanced harmony. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 2008

"An ugly and hysterical episode in American history, vividly rendered by a dogged student of the era."
What happened when Americans discovered what their children were reading between luridly colored covers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Baghdad Blues by Laszlo Hajdu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2015

"A gripping narrative that explores the consequences of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the camaraderie and perseverance of America's veterans."
In Hajdu's (The Spirit of Palm Springs, 2005, etc.) latest novel, the aftermath of the 2003 invasion of Iraq is told by the men and women of the U.S. Army's 3rd Infantry Divi­sion. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID BARCLAY MOORE
by Megan Labrise

Readers of all ages, get ready to catch a rising star. David Barclay Moore’s electric debut, The Stars Beneath Our Feet, is a middle-grade must-read as vibrant and variant as the thrumming thoroughfare where it unfolds: Harlem’s 125th Street.

“If Harlem was a human body, then 125th would be its pumping heart, throbbing all the time,” writes Moore, who ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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BLOG POST

A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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