Search Results: "David Herbert Donald"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 10, 2003

"A rare psychobiography that does not strain the bounds of credulity."
"How could a man who had no friends be also a man who had nothing but friends?" asks Lincoln scholar Donald as he ponders the Great Emancipator's essential loneliness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LINCOLN by David Herbert Donald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A magisterial work, destined to assume its place with those of Beveridge, Sandburg, Thomas, and Oates as a standard life of Lincoln. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club main selection)"
In a significant contribution to Lincoln scholarship, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prizewinning biographer Donald (Harvard; Look Homeward: A Life of Thomas Wolfe, 1987, etc.) draws a richly detailed, absorbing portrait of our 16th president. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"But readers who don't have a special interest in the philosopher are likely to find this too narrow (and, at times, too much of a case of special pleading for a kinder, gentler Nietzsche) to be of use."
``For even if I should be a bad German,'' the peripatetic philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche wrote to his mother in 1886, ``I am at all events a very good European.'' This heavily illustrated volume marshals considerable evidence to demonstrate just how accurate that statement was: For much of his life, Nietzsche wandered restlessly around Europe, preferring to keep his distance from a Germany he found suffocatingly oppressive and second-rate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENEMIES OF SLAVERY by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Smith's awkward paintings are a sad complement to Adler's neither-fish-nor-fowl narrative—the whole is one of those many good intentions that pave the road to you-know-where. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Adler gives 14 "enemies of slavery," black and white, the barest bones of coverage in this series of thumbnail sketches. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION by David A. Adler
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 15, 2003

"Stories of the American Revolution (p. 539). (contents, author's notes, important dates, source notes, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 6-9)"
Adler presents 12 heroes of the American Revolution in an attractive, if slight, volume. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BOOK REVIEW

COLETTE by Herbert Lottman
Released: Feb. 5, 1990

Life of the great French novelist Sidonie Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954), author of Gigi, Cheri, etc. As in his Albert Camus (1979) and Flaubert (1988), biographer Lottman still writes more as a fact-assembler than as one inspired by his subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Most of the other subjects—Reginald Hill, Jeremiah Healy, Catherine Aird, and Barbara Neely—hit Herbert's softballs over the fence too. (Foreword by Antonia Fraser)"
Plotting the contemporary mystery is a tough discipline—a discipline most authors of mainstream fiction would rather spare themselves—to judge from the few consensual opinions expressed in the 13 long interviews that Herbert (editor-in-chief of the forthcoming Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing) conducts with writers from P.D. James to Tony Hillerman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"If grade-schoolers are truly equipped to comprehend a past of poll taxes, lynching and institutional hatred in the place of the current pieties, then Kohl's lesson plan will serve them well."
Everything you know about Rosa Parks is wrong—unless you've been studying with education-reform activist Kohl (A Grain of Poetry, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Winterside's Wanderyear by Herbert Lobsenz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2012

"Engrossing, fiercely intelligent fiction redolent of another era."
Hemingway casts a shadow on this novel of romance and student rebellion in postwar Spain, inspired by the author's Harper Prize-winning Vangel Griffin (1960). Read full book review >