Search Results: "David L. Hammes"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 12, 2012

"A smart, lively account of a revealing episode in economic history."
Hammes' (Economics/Univ. of Hawaii-Hilo; Shaping Our Nation, 1988) nonfiction title sheds light on the great inventor's eccentric, intriguing foray into economic theory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE by Paul Trynka
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2011

"Bowie nerds will love it, and music nerds will admire it; regular nerds and most others will think it's about 150 pages too long."
Everything you always wanted to know about the Thin White Duke. Everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An election-year must-read."
Becker's novel, republished from 1995, imagines an alternate political reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOROTHY L. SAYERS by Barbara Reynolds
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Fans of Lord Peter may feel let down. (Thirty b&w photographs)"
Another ``interim report'' on the life (1893-1957) of the creator of Lord Peter Wimsey and reluctant Christian apologist, by a longtime friend, completer of Sayers's translation of Dante and author of The Passionate Intellect: Dorothy L. Sayers' Encounter with Dante (1989- -not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 11, 1992

"Bibliographies; index. (Biography. 9+)"
An impressively researched account of Baum's variegated career as writer, actor, impresario, filmmaker, and devoted family man, whose health and finances were both often precarious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE L? by Kate Clinton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2005

"Veers wildly among topics, but covers recent political history and gay rights issues with rapid-fire, sometimes blessedly cathartic humor."
Lesbian comic Clinton (Don't Get Me Started, 1998, etc.) riffs on everything from SpongeBob SquarePants to the Supreme Court in this ultra-wry collection of columns and short essays. Read full book review >