Search Results: "David Markson"


BOOK REVIEW

VANISHING POINT by David Markson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2004

"Here, indeed, is a story: brilliant, high, fine, masterful, deep—whether or not there remains an audience capable of embracing it."
Those who adored experimentalist Markson's previous two outings (Reader's Block, 1996; This Is Not a Novel, 2001) will be ecstatic anew as the writer keeps up his near-single-handed effort to keep American prose fiction significant, deep, and subtle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

READER'S BLOCK by David Markson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1996

"Nabokov speaks for Markson's aesthetic aims, while Shakespeare synopsizes the personal wistfulness and deep sorrow permeating this remarkable book."
From the erudite Markson (Wittgenstein's Mistress, 1990, not reviewed; etc.): a terse, modernist novel implying that history is over, the arts finished—yet offering extended, Beckett- like pleasures. ``Reader'' is the speaker here, and he speaks about ``Protagonist.'' Plot and event? ``Someone nodded hello to Reader on the street yesterday'' pretty much takes care of the action side of things. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS NOT A NOVEL by David Markson
Released: April 1, 2001

"Not to the taste of all, true, but wondrous proof, from one of our few worthy successors to Beckett, that in a literary age mainly of entertainment the art-novel—the true-novel—can still take wing."
From the erudite and extraordinary Markson: a sequel to Reader's Block (1997) that has the same high, literary shenanigans as the earlier volume but adds a newly deepened tone as the author looks unblinkingly into the eye of life—and death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOKING AFTER PIGEON by Maud Carol Markson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2009

"Mostly irritating and entirely unnecessary."
A coming-of-age tale from the author of When We Get Home (1989). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BLOG POST

LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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BOOK REVIEW

PEEP AND DUCKY RAINY DAY by David Martin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"Totally in tune with toddlers, this snappy read-aloud gets it right. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Rainy days are oh, so dreary, but not for Peep and Ducky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Aa-Zz by David Hawcock
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An ingenious, if unevenly successful, showpiece. (Pop-up alphabet book. 3 & up)"
Twenty-six pop-up letters—both resolutely minimalist and a tour de force of paper design. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAD DOG by David McPhail
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2014

"Tom is full of curiosity, like a lot of young'uns. Not bad at all. (Early reader. 2-7)"
A preschool-age boy narrates this short early reader, a straightforward story about a mischievous dog and the boy who loves him. Read full book review >