Search Results: "David Meissner"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A memorable adventure, told with great immediacy. (timeline, author's notes, bibliography, resources) (Nonfiction. 11 & up)"
A remarkable collection of documents paints a picture of the Klondike gold rush in vivid detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA by W.W. Meissner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 14, 1992

"An ambitious attempt to join the couch and the prie-dieu, this reveals much about the saint as a man, almost nothing about the man as a saint. (Twenty-four illustrations.)"
Far-reaching, sometimes far-fetched psychobiography of the Catholic mystic, saint, and founder of the Jesuits. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROAD TO COSMOS by Bill Meissner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2006

"Unrelenting blandness dooms even the most eccentric of Meissner's characters."
A collection of memory pieces and character sketches rather than short stories, from a poet and author of the collection Hitting Into the Wind (1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARS OVER SUNSET BOULEVARD by Susan Meissner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A lovely, well-crafted story that peeks at a fascinating moment in cinematic history and examines the power and vulnerability of sincere friendship."
Two women become friends while working at Selznick International Studios during the heady days of filming Gone With the Wind.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HITTING INTO THE WIND by Bill Meissner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Some lovely writing, but monotonous."
Boys pitching balls in midwestern backyards, old farm-team players searching for ``lost'' balls in small-town fields, minor- league fielders ``waiting for the call''—these quintessentially American characters inhabit the 20-odd stories and sketches collected in this fiction debut by poet Meissner (The Sleepwalker's Son, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FALL OF MARIGOLDS by Susan Meissner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 4, 2014

"Touching and inspirational."
A scarf ties together the stories of two women as they struggle with personal journeys 100 years apart in Meissner's historical novel (The Girl in the Glass, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BRIDGE ACROSS THE OCEAN by Susan Meissner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 14, 2017

"An interesting World War II narrative is dragged down by a less-engaging present-day story."
A woman who can see ghosts becomes tangled in a mystery involving European war brides who crossed the Atlantic on the Queen Mary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMBER'S AMBITIONS by Janice I. Meissner
ROMANCE
Released: May 25, 2011

"Meissner attempts to create a believable, determined protagonist, but the lack of conflict and convenient plot devices keep Amber's tale from resonating."
A romance about a determined young woman and her life's goals. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

POST-APOCALYPTIC FICTION. TOO SOON?
by Karen Schechner

The collective love for post-apocalyptic fiction might have dipped a bit since The Handmaid’s Tale started to hew too closely to reality. But it’s an irresistible subgenre. For those looking for more depictions of a frightening, all-too-plausible future run by religious zealots hungry for control, The Seekers series, by David Litwack, may suit.  

In the series’ debut, The Children ...


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BLOG POST

HE MAKES HIS STAND IN THE AUDITORIUM
by Sarah Pitre

 

BOOK REPORT for Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story by David Levithan

Cover Story: Fabulous
BFF Charm: Extra Sparkly Platinum
Swoonworthy Scale: 3
Talky Talk: The Script
Bonus Factors: LGBTQ, Musical
Relationship Status: Season Ticket Holder

 

Cover Story: Fabulous

Since this book is written as a script, the cover is extremely fitting. But the most appropriate aspect ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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