Search Results: "David Patneaude"


BOOK REVIEW

THIN WOOD WALLS by David Patneaude
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2004

"An important and forceful a contribution to the field. (Historical fiction. 6-9)"
On the brink of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Joe Hanada and his family search for the perfect Christmas tree, invited to do so by a good neighbor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEONE WAS WATCHING by David Patneaude
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 1993

"But holding everything together are the characters' feelings; their grief and reactions to various dilemmas are so pure and credible that readers will willingly put doubts aside to join in the search. (Fiction. 11-13)"
The sadness pervading the first few pages of this decently written first novel is almost overwhelming: Chris and his parents return to the summer home where his toddler sister Molly apparently drowned three months earlier; the family is just beginning to come to grips with their loss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRAMED IN FIRE by David Patneaude
Released: April 1, 1999

"His writing style, however, is so robust that even if readers find little remotely connected to reality in these pages, there's more than enough suspense in the fast-paced narrative to keep them entertained. (Fiction. 8-13)"
Patneaude (The Last Man's Reward, 1996, etc.) hatches a silly plot and one-dimensional characters, but preteens might enjoy this piece of escapist entertainment about a boy wrongly committed to a mental asylum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PIECE OF THE SKY by David Patneaude
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2007

"An entertaining light summer read. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Following the discovery by Dr. John Evans of a valuable ten-ton meteorite in a remote area of mountainous Port Orford, Ore., in 1856, the modern consequences swing from attempted murder motivated by greed to natural wonder born by scientific curiosity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EPITAPH ROAD by David Patneaude
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 23, 2010

"The first-person point of view and the page-turning plot of this post-apocalyptic thriller will hook readers awaiting the final installment of the Hunger Games trilogy and provoke more than a few thoughts as well. (Science fiction. 10 & up)"
Fourteen-year-old Kellen Dent is one of the few males left on Earth after a plague in 2067 killed 97 percent of the males and left women in charge of the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST MAN'S REWARD by David Patneaude
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"He shows that suspense is possible without such outright villainy, and that reading about good people who do right is just as satisfying as reading about bad people getting their just deserts. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Albert and his four friends are living in company-owned apartments just until their parents find houses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Charming stories, these have the spooky premises to grab horror fans, and will hold them with the promise of something better than blood and gore. (Short stories. 11-14)"
A collection of stories, five of which deal with intrusions of the supernatural into everyday life: A freshman track star is helped by a ghostly trainer, a boy learns to fight off night monsters with the help of a mysterious clown, a girl locates the ghost of Jimi Hendrix for her terminally ill aunt, a man who was supposedly murdered visits his old neighborhood, and two children are given a chance at immortality by aliens. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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BLOG POST

LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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