Search Results: "David R. Montgomery"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"A sorry, scary future for salmon and their ecosystem if this author's warnings go unheeded. (25 b&w photographs, 2 maps, not seen)"
Wild salmon may be headed for the Land of the Dodo, argues Montgomery (Geomorphology/Univ. of Washington), unless obvious measures are taken to protect and restore their environment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GROWING A REVOLUTION by David R. Montgomery
NON-FICTION
Released: May 9, 2017

"Montgomery's fascinating exposé of how our food is grown will convince readers that soil health should not remain an under-the-radar issue and that we all benefit from embracing a new philosophy of farming."
An optimistic look at how regenerative farming can revive the world's soil, increasing food production, boosting cost effectiveness, and slowing climate change. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"A must-read for avid gardeners, those interested in bolstering our precarious food supply, or anyone remotely concerned about their health and the soil under their feet."
A geologist and a biologist and environmental planner chronicle the transformation of their desolate Seattle backyard into a fertile garden and how they learned about the importance of beneficial microbes in their newly revived soil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 27, 2012

"A forceful rallying cry for people of goodwill to join together to develop an alternative to the dangerous irrationalism that afflicts so many Americans."
Geology and history bring the relationship between science and religion into focus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITIZEN WORKER by David Montgomery
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In sum, an academic's informed and densely annotated reflections on the paradox of freedom as it applied to earlier workers; offering few substantive links to 20th-century circumstances, however, the study's appeal appears limited to specialists."
A perceptive but pedantic look at the socioeconomic and political lot of America's 19th-century working class. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEETLE by David Hawcock
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"(Nonfiction. 4-8)"
Beetle ($6.99; April 1, 1996; 8 pp.; 0-679-87566-2): This entry in the Bouncing Bugs series (other titles include Fly, ISBN 0-679- 87567-0, and Wasp, -87565-4) has pop-ups, foldout pages, and snippets of information aimed at budding entomologists about what the title insect eats, what its parts are called, etc. Too creepy for preschoolers but ideal for lower elementary children is the last spread, which, when the book covers are folded back and looped together with a covered elastic string, pops into a huge, realistically detailed bug, easily seen by the back rows. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BUILDING BOY by Ross Montgomery
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2017

"Sad and sweet. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A little white boy completes Grandma's dream house with a hammer and a bit of magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1994

"Nevertheless, the cumulative effect of the collection is invigorating and should bring recognition to some lesser-known writers whose originality deserves applause."
This anthology of recent experimental fiction selected by past and present editors of the Iowa Review is a mixed bag containing many a chuckle, an occasional yawn, and perhaps half a dozen true revelations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 29, 1994

"Photos; chronology (with one date mismatched with a text date); bibliography; index. (Biography. 10+)"
Brisk writing drives this sympathetic portrait of a vivacious woman who was probably unfairly criticized in her own day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"It is a well-worn path through a very public landscape that Foster travels, and he fails to jump the ruts."
Any way you slice Harvard University ecologist Foster's evolutionary portrait of the New England landscape—psychogeography, an archaeology of place, glimmerings of the swiftness of nature's transformations—his choice of subject thwarts him: whatever he has to say, it has been better said before Foster's point is clear and sensible: "Nature can only be understood through an awareness of its history," and if we are to appreciate, conserve, and manage ecosystems, we must know that history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLIFF by David R. Slavitt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Witty and urbane, the book is sure to capture the minds, if not the hearts, of armchair travelers and those who enjoy dark humor with their literature."
Prolific author Slavitt (Turkish Delights, 1993, etc.) deals up a delightful satire that punctures academia with a sure and measured hand. Read full book review >