Search Results: "David Remnick"


BOOK REVIEW

REPORTING by David Remnick
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2006

"Elegant, interesting, even memorable, certainly more so than most magazine writing."
New Yorker editor Remnick (King of the World, 1998, etc.) continues a happy tradition of self-anthologizing, gathering favorite pieces from the past two decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1997

"Full of memorable portraits of those he met, full of nuance, full of empathy with the Russians, this is a worthy successor to Lenin's Tomb. (Author tour)"
It would be hard for New Yorker writer Remnick to do anything quite as good as his Pulitzer Prizewinning Lenin's Tomb (1993), but his study of Russia since 1991 shows all the restless intelligence, hard work, and fine writing that made that work so memorable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL PROBLEM by David Remnick
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"On the whole, though, this is a superbly entertaining collection."
Pulitzer Prize winner Remnick (Lenin's Tomb, 1993) turns his attention to . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BRIDGE by David Remnick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 6, 2010

"Remnick's fluent writing makes this expansive, significant book move along swiftly. Readers will look forward to the sequel, eight years from now."
From New Yorker editor Remnick (Reporting: Writings from The New Yorker, 2006, etc.), a world-ranging, eye-opening, comprehensive life to date of the 44th President of the United States Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 11, 2000

"Thoughtful and thought-provoking, but, with only the most tenuous connections linking the various pieces, it seems little more than a clothbound special issue of the New Yorker."
A powerful if uneven collection of essays on the New Economy and the changes it's wrought. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIFE STORIES by David Remnick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Taken together, the collection amounts to a mordantly amusing meditation on the varieties of fame in 20th-century America."
This companion anniversary volume to Remnick's short-story anthology Wonderful Town (p. 1912) collects 25 of the biographical Profiles that have long been a hallmark of The New Yorker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"But no matter: This is a great look at 'a warrior who came to symbolize love.' (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A literate, intelligent evocation of the great heavyweight champion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1993

"Brilliant, evocative, riveting."
It's hard to imagine any book on the last years of Communism in the Soviet Union surpassing this one by Remnick, who covered the events for The Washington Post. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE by Paul Trynka
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2011

"Bowie nerds will love it, and music nerds will admire it; regular nerds and most others will think it's about 150 pages too long."
Everything you always wanted to know about the Thin White Duke. Everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >