Search Results: "David Roberts"


BOOK REVIEW

THOSE MAGNIFICENT SHEEP IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES by Peter Bently
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Just pure, wooly-headed fun. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A passel of sheep, who vaguely resemble characters from the titular movie, are quietly grazing on the hillside when they are startled by a loud noise overhead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUNDERHEADS BEHIND BARS by Paul Fleischman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Delightfully smart and deliciously funny—don't miss it. (Fiction. 7-9)"
The Dunderheads are back in another amusing caper that's sure to please fans of their earlier exploits (The Dunderheads, 2009). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCLE MONTAGUE’S TALES OF TERROR by Chris Priestley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Priestley usually does better. (Short stories. 11-13)"
The author's attempts to create atmosphere with constant references to half-glimpsed figures, encroaching fog, unexplained noises, etc., come off as labored in these ten tales of the supernatural. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUNDERHEADS by Paul Fleischman
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2009

"Share with special readers; it's well worth the effort. (Fiction. 7-10)"
A group of underachievers engages in a battle of wits with their unsympathetic teacher and emerges triumphant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T SAY THAT, WILLY NILLY! by Anna Powell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"This modern spin lacks the charm of previous versions, making this moderately silly variation only for those who haven't heard the original. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Willy Nilly is no Epaminondas in this cartoonish, contemporary version of the old classic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEET POISON by David Roberts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Despite much political blather, a rather conventional debut whodunit—the first in a series—with ample misdirection but not much depth."
The Duke of Mersham's dinner party has not been going well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Certainly enticing stuff for buffs of things southwestern, but more so to readers with an eye to the ironies and paradoxes of history."
A close look at one of the most bloody, mysterious episodes in the history of what's now the Southwest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 3, 2000

"Not as gripping as Into Thin Air, but fans of daring outdoor exploits (especially those with long memories) will find this a satisfying armchair adventure."
A former true believer discovers that Maurice Herzog's best-selling Annapurna (a stirring, romantic account of the first ascent of an 8,000-meter peak in the Himalayas) left out some of the adventure's nastier details and some of the team's more rancorous moments. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST WORLD OF THE OLD ONES by David Roberts
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 4, 2015

"For fans of all things Southwestern—not quite as robust and thoughtful as Craig Childs' House of Rain (2007) but a pleasure to read."
More travels in the Southwest of yore by outdoorsman/writer Roberts (Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"Of a piece with Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven (2003), though without its drama—serviceable, but really a magazine article plumped up to book length."
Roberts (Sandstone Spine: Seeking the Anasazi on the First Traverse of the Comb Ridge, 2005, etc.) elaborates on a footnote to the history of westward expansion, excoriating the early leaders of Mormonism in the bargain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POINTS UNKNOWN by David Roberts
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Still, Roberts's anthology has its virtues, and readers will find plenty to enjoy."
Intrepid adventurers face the elements—and sometimes live to tell the tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 5, 2003

"Caveats aside, dogged research and hard travel to distant places make for a gem in the literature of survival under dire conditions."
A flabbergasting, if leisurely paced, story of survival in the Far North during the 18th century, shrouded by the enjoyable mystery of half-understood but decidedly atavistic circumstances. Read full book review >