Search Results: "David Shenk"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 4, 2001

"The subject may be depressing, but it's also important, and the author holds the reader's interest to the end."
An intelligent and helpful tour of Alzheimer's, by science writer Shenk (The End of Patience, 1999). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 5, 2006

"With appendices offering detailed game analyses, illustration of rules and Ben Franklin's essay 'The Morals of Chess,' this proves an enriching guide for lay readers who'd like to be chess aficionados but don't know where to start."
In this compelling, accessible study, Shenk (The Forgetting Alzheimer's, 2001) ponders the question: Does playing chess require great minds, or are great minds formed by playing chess? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 9, 2010

"Upbeat and entertaining."
An empowering view of our possibilities for achievement, and a myth-busting approach to common ideas about the inheritance of brains and talent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWERS OF TWO by Joshua Wolf Shenk
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"Shenk's inclusion of fascinating biographical material enlivens his provocative thesis on the genesis of creative innovation."
Shenk (Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness, 2005, etc.) debunks "the myth of the lone genius [that] has towered over us like a colossus" and its counterpart, "the most common alternative [that]…locates creativity in networks." Read full book review >

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DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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LOVE YA
by Bobbi Dumas

Hi friends!

I don’t read a lot of Young Adult/New Adult books, but I’ve become a fan of Huntley Fitzpatrick.

I think I’ve read all of her books now (and hope a new one is coming out soon!).

I just finished What I Thought Was True, and I invite you all to read it!

Sometimes, with YA, I feel ...


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BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2005

"An inspirational tale of how suffering bred a visionary of hard-won wisdom."
A significant contribution to the study of Lincoln and his battle with depression that will resonate with contemporary Americans. Read full book review >

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DAVID GARROW
by Gregory McNamee

Barack Obama has been portrayed as being many things over his life and political career. Some have thought him flippant, coasting by on charm and glibness. Others have thought him suspect. Admirers and detractors both have found him aloof, though very few have doubted the fact of his formidable intelligence.

And admirers and detractors alike have also found Barack Obama ...


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A READING YEAR: SOMETIMES A CHANGE OF PERSPECTIVE IS USEFUL
by J. Kingston Pierce

Last December, after posting my “favorite crime novels of 2015” list, I put together a rather different assessment of the year’s new offerings in this genre. Rather than confine myself to picking 10 books (all released in the United States) that I judged to have been particularly well-written and memorable—a traditional and potentially valuable, but admittedly limiting exercise—I expanded my ...


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BOOK REVIEW

HOW MACHINES WORK by David Macaulay
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"'So clever!' murmurs the elephant shrew, admiring himself in a mirror. No argument here. (glossary, some unattached pieces) (Pop-up fiction/nonfiction hybrid. 7-9)"
A pair of would-be escapees discovers the uses and misuses of simple machines in this slapstick STEMwinder. Read full book review >