Search Results: "David Shields"


BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTHER PEOPLE by David Shields
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Uneven but mostly sharp and appealing."
An assortment of musings, cultural critiques, and memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HANDBOOK FOR DROWNING by David Shields
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 15, 1992

"As to the estimable achievement of Dead Languages, what's here is a little bit like finding a plate of hors d'oeuvres after the dinner is already eaten."
Uneven but often alluring stories, though many of them read like outtakes from Dead Languages, Shields's ambitious 1989 novel of a son's growing up under the stressful nurturing of eccentric parents who were also passionately liberal intellectuals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD LANGUAGES by David Shields
Released: April 24, 1989

Second-novelist Shields (Heroes, 1984) takes on the hoary old coming-of-age (of a writer, no less) genre and manages to give it passion, Çlan, humor, and plenty of depth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID BOWIE by Paul Trynka
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 18, 2011

"Bowie nerds will love it, and music nerds will admire it; regular nerds and most others will think it's about 150 pages too long."
Everything you always wanted to know about the Thin White Duke. Everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID COPPERFIELD by Charles Dickens
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Marks's storytelling skills are further demonstrated by the different sizes of the pictures, their distribution, and layout—on the whole, they evocatively conjure this hearty tale, and will send readers off to the original. (Picture book. 8-12)"
A more or less self-contained excerpt from the novel, in a creative abridgement done by Dickens for one of his public readings (Anthea Bell's afterword provides notes about these performances and the texts Dickens prepared for them). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2004

"Pensive and shrewd."
A thinking person's collection of sports essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 2, 2002

"Gladdeningly inclusive, like a hug from Walt Whitman: declarative and fraught and good."
Novelist and cultural commentator Shields (the nonfictional Black Planet, 1999, etc.) explores "his own damned, doomed character" in this plum collection of vignettes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW LITERATURE SAVED MY LIFE by David Shields
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 8, 2013

"A work of contradictions, subversions, depression, humor and singular awareness; Shields is at his finest when culling the work of others to arrive at his own well-timed, often heartbreaking lines."
Essayist and fiction writer Shields (Reality Hunger: A Manifesto, 2010, etc.) turns quotation, memory, anecdotes and considerations of film, literature, love and death into a collage that enables introspection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THING ABOUT LIFE IS THAT ONE DAY YOU’LL BE DEAD by David Shields
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 6, 2008

"Lively skirmishes with a deathly topic, giving the loss of life its due."
A finely crafted exploration of aging from gimlet-eyed essayist Shields (Body Politic: The Great American Sports Machine, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 23, 2010

"We dream ourselves awake every minute of the day.'"
The subtitle of David Shields' Reality Hunger categorizes it as "a manifesto," which is a little like calling a nuclear bomb "a weapon." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REMOTE by David Shields
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A winning combination of humor and insight—Seinlanguage for highbrows. (57 photos)"
Poised at the intersection of cultural commentary and self-analysis, fiction writer Shields (A Handbook for Drowning, 1992, etc.) creates an idiosyncratic, droll, sporadically ravishing assemblage that both investigates and replicates the fragmented, irony-poisoned, celebrity-obsessed consciousness of fin-de-siäcle America. Read full book review >