Search Results: "David Wiesner"


BOOK REVIEW

FLOTSAM by David Wiesner
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2006

"An invitation not to be resisted. (Picture book. 6-11)"
From arguably the most inventive and cerebral visual storyteller in children's literature, comes a wordless invitation to drift with the tide, with the story, with your eyes, with your imagination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE PIGS by David Wiesner
ANIMALS
Released: April 23, 2001

"On the last few pages, the final words of the text break apart, sending letters drifting down into the illustrations to show us that once we have ventured out into the wider world, our stories never stay the same. (Picture book. 5-9)"
With this inventive retelling, Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (Tuesday, 1991) plays with literary conventions in a manner not seen since Scieszka's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. WUFFLES! by David Wiesner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Expertly imagined, composed, drawn and colored, this is Wiesner at his best. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A house cat pooh-poohs most proffered toys and gets his comeuppance tangling with a tiny alien spacecraft and its penny-sized adventurers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUNE 29, 1999 by David Wiesner
Released: Oct. 19, 1992

"Hurray for Wiesner, and his grand sense of humor! (Picture book. 5+)"
A follow-up to Tuesday (Caldecott, 1992): This time it's flocks of gigantic vegetables wafting through the air, landing all over the US—turnips larger than trees in the Rockies, plane-sized artichokes in Anchorage, limas in Levittown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREE FALL by David Wiesner
Released: April 20, 1988

"Intriguing."
In an imaginative wordless picture book, Wiesner (illustrator of Kite Flyer, 1986) tours a dream world suggested by the books and objects in a boy's room. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAVID by Mary Hoffman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"Nonfiction masquerading as a novel and failing as either sort of narrative. (character list, historical note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
The author of the Stravaganaza series reveals the muse behind Michelangelo's David. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ART & MAX by David Wiesner
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 4, 2010

"In this illustrator's world, mind-blowing art comes from accident, if you're brave enough (like Max) to smile and take an awkward leap. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Two lizards, one an unbridled enthusiast and the other a restrained snoot, stumble along a circuitous creative path together, making art through mishap and engaging all kinds of media along the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUESDAY by David Wiesner
Released: April 22, 1991

"Nifty! (Picture book. 3+)"
On Tuesday, just as the full moon is rising, the lily pads take off—each topped by a serene, personable frog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRICANE by David Wiesner
Released: Oct. 22, 1990

"The realistic text is adequate but unexceptional; however, Wiesner's broad double spreads, which echo Van Allsburg's sense of wonder, are nicely evocative."
The creator of Free Fall (Caldecott Honor, 1989) re-creates a childhood experience: two brothers in a suburban house get ready for a storm, enjoy its excitement, and afterwards have a fine, imaginative time playing on a fallen tree until it is finally hauled away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRICANEI by David Wiesner
Released: Oct. 22, 1990

The creator of Free Fall (Caldecott Honor, 1989) re-creates a childhood experience: two brothers in a suburban house get ready for a storm, enjoy its excitement, and afterwards have a fine, imaginative time playing on a fallen tree until it is finally hauled away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECTOR 7 by David Wiesner
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Others will find themselves scratching their heads as to his purpose, other than indulging in elliptical displays and in pointlessly defying convention. (Picture book. 5-7)"
From levitating frogs to giant vegetables that take wing, Wiesner resuscitates his fondness for flying in another stretch of his imagination. Read full book review >