Search Results: "Debbie Tilley"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"Parenting tips on further sibling preparation appear at the end of the book. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yet another title to add to the already oversaturated new baby brother/new baby sister market. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVE’S FIRST SLEEPOVER by Roberta Baker
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: July 1, 2007

"Baker's splendid tale is just the thing to share with readers approaching this major event, or for those just looking for a good giggle. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Baker's inimitable Olive tackles a major childhood milestone with her usual panache. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAUREN MCGILL’S PICKLE MUSEUM by Jerdine Nolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"Kids will relish this dilly of a story without a sour note anywhere. (Picture book. 5-8)"
"Lauren McGill was absolutely wild about pickles." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: April 1, 1996

This sequel to the highly entertaining Does God Have a Big Toe? (1989) combines retellings of Old Testament stories and invented stories about Biblical characters, mainly Adam and Moses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVE’S PIRATE PARTY by Roberta Baker
ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

The can-do star of No Ordinary Olive (2002) returns to get her pirate-themed seventh birthday party shipshape—with some unexpected help. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BABIES AND COOKIES by Mary Hanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"There's plenty of love between older and younger sister, so the effect is both funny and charming making this a great new addition. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A little girl responds to her mother's description of babies with an alternate point of view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK FINCH, LOUDMOUTH by Tess Weaver
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 19, 2008

"Read this book with Frederick's brio and it will pay for itself. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Not that it doesn't have its charms, but Weaver's story about finding a calling is pretty silly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIZARD WALINSKY by Roberta Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2004

"The expressionistic watercolor-and-ink illustrations, plus the dinosaur subtext, transform a somewhat ordinary story into a lively celebration of special friends. (Picture book. 3-7)"
As they did in No Ordinary Olive (2002), the Baker and Tilley team introduce another engaging heroine in this amusing affirmation of friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO ORDINARY OLIVE by Roberta Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Olive is sweet enough, but more ingenious feet than Baker's have trod this ground. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Newcomer Baker takes on an old topic: How free spirits, however peculiar, allow us to see the world in a different, often better way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GROWING UP by Mavis Jukes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Jukes's common sense extends to many aspects of girls' health, reminding them to take good care of their bodies, eat well, and relax—there is plenty of time to think and learn about growing up. (b&w illustrations, index, not seen) (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
This informative and direct book for pre-pubescent girls discusses everything they'll want to know about—periods, bras, tampons, breasts, cramps, etc.—in an age-appropriate manner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIDDLE-ICIOUS by J. Patrick Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"Far superior to most riddle books in merit and for the visual humor in the colorful ink-and- watercolor illustrations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Lewis (Black Swan/White Crow, 1995, etc.) offers 28 ``poems that hide/behind disguises'' and ``tickle you with/small surprises,'' each with a funny picture clue that makes most of the riddles easily guessed by preschoolers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIBBITY RIBBIT! by Suzanne C. Johnson
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 14, 2001

"Fribbity-ribbit, great fun. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This high-octane romp with a frog will have your tongue tied in knots as the little jug-o-rum disrupts an entire household while trying to make its escape. Read full book review >