Search Results: "Deborah Freedman"


BOOK REVIEW

BY MOUSE AND FROG by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 14, 2015

"An elegant, exuberant portrayal of stylistic differences and child-writer passion. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mouse wants to tell a simple, gentle story, but Frog bounces in and stirs it up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF FISH AND SNAIL by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 13, 2013

"This marvelous metabook shines in both concept and beauty. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Right from the title page, Freedman's latest makes a splash. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCRIBBLE by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2007

Two children's drawings come to life in a clear case of, as the blurb so aptly puts it, "scribbling rivalry." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE CHICKEN by Deborah Freedman
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Delicate and durable, visually sophisticated yet friendly: simply exquisite. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Breathtakingly beautiful meta-illustrations will draw many eyes to this tale of a curious chicken who spills some paint. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHY by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An exquisite treasure for bashful readers, animal lovers, and anyone who's ever wanted a friend. (Picture book. 3-7, adult)"
Someone extremely shy finds a friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS HOUSE, ONCE by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Tender, comforting, and complex. (author's note) (Picture book. 3-8)"
Softly, poetically, an unseen narrator explores a house and what it is made of. Read full book review >

ARTICLE

MY CLASSROOM FILE
by Julie Danielson

I feel like a broken record saying this, because I’ve muttered it many times here before, but there are some picture books that make me wish I could snap my fingers and instantly be back in a school library. Or they have me scrambling to find the closest librarian friend who will let me visit and temporarily take over story ...


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BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"As immigration continues to be a major issue in America, this introduction to the Angel Island experience is overdue and, most of all, welcome. (source notes, selected bibliography, acknowledgments, picture credits) (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
Writing with clarity, Newbery Medal winner Freedman (Becoming Ben Franklin, 2013, etc.) explores a lesser-known period in U.S. immigration history, when the San Francisco Golden Gate was anything but welcoming. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1975

"There is no attempt at parallelism among the six different sketches, which could make for a slackness overall, but Freedman does give you the feeling (with his frog escaping from a boy's grasp by emptying her bladder and screaming like a human baby, or his rattlesnake swallowing and digesting a lizard) that you are sharing firsthand observations, not just enduring another regurgitation."
What happens after The First Days of Life (1974)—to a tadpole becoming a frog, a rattlesnake during his first summer, an eagle getting ready to go off on her own, and two beaver kits between their first temporary displacement for their mother's next litter and their permanent expulsion from the family lodge a year later. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BRAZIL of BENJAMIN EAST by Jonathan Freedman
FICTION & LITERATURE

"A spirited, hopeful novel that serves as a reminder that change is always possible."
A returned expat and a young artist take a road trip across America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1967

"Boys—who needn't be Scouts—will enjoy it thoroughly."
The operative word is with—you'll fetch tea for the "uppers" at Charterhouse, travel from London to wales by collapsible boat (and a few portages), go pigsticking in India, reconnoitering in Afghanistan and Zululand, draw maps in the guise of butterflies' wings as a Malta-based spy, stalk the Ashanti on the Gold Coast and the Matabele in Rhodesia, and finally withstand the siege of Mafeking that made Baden-Powell the hero of Britain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW ANIMALS LEARN by Russell Freedman
Released: April 15, 1969

"As discerning as Kay's How Smart Are Animals, emphasizing learning types rather than the representative animals, and avoiding some psych class labels (generalization, discrimination), which may make this more accessible to more (and younger) readers."
Kids will learn How Animals Learn from this cogent presentation—everything from Pavlov to problem-solving, well illustrated with photographs and diagrams (even some elementary line graphs) and salted with projects for home testing. Read full book review >