Search Results: "Deborah Hopkinson"


BOOK REVIEW

DEBORAH by Esther Singer Kreitman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Essentially a curiosity, of some documentary value, but only marginal literary interest."
Accusatory autobiographical fiction, first published in 1936 as The Devil's Dance, enumerates the frustrations of an intellectually curious woman denied opportunities for education and self-expression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIVE! by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Fascinating World War II history for history buffs and browsers alike. (epilogue, bibliography, source notes) (Nonfiction. 8-14)"
Hopkinson's writing plumbs the depths in relating the undersea exploits of American submariners during World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"A thorough and absorbing recreation of the ill-fated voyage. (Nonfiction. 8-16)"
In what's sure to be a definitive work commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, Hopkinson offers a well-researched and fascinating account of the disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2006

"Based on eyewitness accounts, the tale brings to life an event young readers will find fascinating. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
Running away from the county poor farm in Texas, 11-year-old Nicholas Dray arrives in San Francisco penniless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2006

"What might have been a dry topic is lively, the voices of the children vivid and personal. (Nonfiction. 9+)"
"The voices of children weave through the story of cotton," and the story of cotton weaves through the story of our nation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Nonfiction at its best and a good companion to Mary Jane Auch's Ashes of Roses (2002), Johanna Hurwitz's Dear Emma (2002), and other recent works on the subject. (foreword, afterword, timeline, notes, photo credits, index) (Nonfiction. 9+)"
Between 1880 and 1919, 23 million people came to America, most through the port of New York and most from eastern and southern Europe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIA'S COMET by Deborah Hopkinson
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Pair this with Don Brown's Rare Treasure (p. 1223), about Mary Anning and her fossils. (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
From Hopkinson (Birdie's Lighthouse, 1997, etc.) comes another strong, simply told story, based loosely on the life of 19th- century astronomer Maria Mitchell, about a girl with a particular kind of wanderlust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BANDIT'S TALE by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 5, 2016

"Even though—in the book's one predictable touch—Rocco gives up being a liar and a criminal, he's reliably entertaining till the end of the story. (map, historical notes, bibliography, pickpocket's glossary) (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
Italian immigrant and new New Yorker Rocco Zaccaro is not an unreliable narrator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"An informative, often gripping chronicle of daring, heroic acts of young men and women who did not stand by as their country was occupied by a dangerous enemy. (photos, maps, chronology, bibliography, source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Patriotic men and women fight against German occupiers in this absorbing chronicle of the World War II resistance movement in Denmark. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"An odd hybrid in which the personal and political awkwardly jostle one another and tend to get hopelessly mixed up in the fray."
Expressly following the feminist dictum that ``the personal is political,'' Pogrebin (Among Friends, 1986; Family Politics, 1983, etc.), a founding editor of Ms. magazine, mixes memoir with reportage to chart her dual commitment to Judaism and feminism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEAMBOAT SCHOOL by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 7, 2016

"An unforgettable story that needs to be known. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A passion for education and freedom brings subversive ingenuity to life in 1847 St. Louis. Read full book review >