Search Results: "Deborah Jones"


BOOK REVIEW

DEBORAH by Esther Singer Kreitman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Essentially a curiosity, of some documentary value, but only marginal literary interest."
Accusatory autobiographical fiction, first published in 1936 as The Devil's Dance, enumerates the frustrations of an intellectually curious woman denied opportunities for education and self-expression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"An odd hybrid in which the personal and political awkwardly jostle one another and tend to get hopelessly mixed up in the fray."
Expressly following the feminist dictum that ``the personal is political,'' Pogrebin (Among Friends, 1986; Family Politics, 1983, etc.), a founding editor of Ms. magazine, mixes memoir with reportage to chart her dual commitment to Judaism and feminism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASPER JONES by Craig Silvey
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 12, 2011

"A richly rewarding exploration of truth and lies by a masterful storyteller. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Charlie is catapulted into adulthood when Jasper Jones knocks on his window on a blisteringly hot Australian night and leads him to a hidden glade where a girl is hanging from a tree, bruised and bloody. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPYJON JONES by Judy Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Both feline hero and story are full of beans (more Mexican-jumping than pinto) but ay caramba, mucho fun. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Skippyjon Jones insists he's not a Siamese cat despite ears too big for his head and a head too big for his body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK JONES by Hugh Kenner
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The other two are Greg Sarris's Mabel McKay: Weaving the Dream, profiling the Pomo basket weaver and medicine woman, and Yvonne Fern's Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation, a discussion with the creator of Star Trek."
Dr. Seuss created the Grinch, but it took Chuck Jones to make him move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Many of the jokes work, but too often Kelly seems like a desperate comedian, pulling out joy buzzers and chattering teeth and one rubber chicken too many. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
It's hard to believe a book could contain too many chickens, but this novel may test readers' patience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEDUSA JONES by Ross Collins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Would work especially well alongside a unit on Greek mythology. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A fast-paced and funny middle-school drama about popularity and teasing with a mythological twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER JONES by Elliott J. Gorn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2001

"Amid the current concerns over global labor exploitation, this is a timely, unromanticized reminder that human suffering has accompanied industrial change in the past, and that people fought to ameliorate it."
A stimulating biography of the pugnacious labor organizer that sheds light on radical movements while questioning the myth-making machine that surrounds great figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAPSCALLION JONES by James Marshall
Released: Oct. 1, 1983

"Trite and lame."
Some hollow flimflam about an aging, needy fox who decides to become a writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARMAN JONES by Robert A. Heinlein
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1953

"Clifford Geary's black and whites add to the Heinlein inventiveness."
Forced-landing on an earth-like planet mars a trip to another solar system, but provides young Max Jones with a set of adventures that see him become a full-fledged Astrogator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEARLESS JONES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

Even before sultry Elana Love walks into mild-mannered Paris Minton's life three months after his Watts bookstore opens, Mosley can't resist his signature scene: A pair of cops stroll into the shop determined to push Paris around just because he's a black man and it's 1954. Read full book review >