Search Results: "Deborah da Costa"


BOOK REVIEW

HANUKKAH MOON by Deborah da Costa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

This Hanukkah, Isobel stays with her Mexican Aunt Luisa and discovers a new way to celebrate the festival of the lights. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOW IN JERUSALEM by Deborah da Costa
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Development, human and feline, is nicely characterized. (author's note, glossary) (Picture book. 6-9)"
In an innocuous, basically uninteresting story, two boys who are citizens of Jerusalem, an Israeli-Arab and an Israeli-Jew, discover that they've been caring for the same cat in their respective neighborhoods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1994

"A first-rate account of a little-known episode that had large consequences for Britain and for the world: careful, professional scholarship married to a well-told story."
An engrossing history of an obscure incident: the 1823 mass uprising of slaves in the South American British colony of Demerara (present-day Guyana). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 21, 2013

"An engaging historical study of New York City poverty."
An enlightening, comprehensive account of family poverty throughout New York City's history. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DEBORAH WILLIS
by Megan Labrise

Don’t be afraid of The Dark and Other Love Stories but be warned: Deborah Willis’s delectable fictions aren’t amorous confections.

“I think that title is a bit misleading—actually, I know it is,” says Willis, by phone from home in Calgary. “A lot of people, when I tell them the title say, That sounds so lovely! I can’t wait!” ...


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BOOK REVIEW

COLORS OF THE MOUNTAIN by Da Chen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Chen's memoir displays an unusual and remarkable insight into Chinese life, and into the resilience of the human spirit. (Author tour)"
A moving evocation of life in a remote village in China in the 1960s and '70s. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JAMES PARKS AND BEN COSTA
by Alex Heimbach

“A skeleton and a slime walk into a bar…” That may sound like the wind up to a very nerdy joke, but it’s actually the set up for a scene in James Parks and Ben Costa’s new YA graphic novel, Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli, which, to be fair, is full of very nerdy — ...


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BLOG POST

A LITERARY SECURITY BLANKET
by Leila Roy

I have a problem, and I suspect that some of you out there might suffer from it, too: there are too many books in my bag.

I try to keep their numbers down—after all, I really only bring my bag to work with me, and I work less than ten miles from home—but no matter how many times I empty ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Kurenai the Crimson by Hana da Yumiko
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Needs more flesh on its bones, though extensive research and complex plots are signs of good things to come."
A Christian, an outcast ninja, and a courtesan—outsiders in late samurai-era Nagasaki—seek new life in this historical novella. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARWIN'S BACKYARD by James T. Costa
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"While casual readers may not be tempted to perform the experiments, the insights Costa provides into Darwin's thinking and his revelations about the great man's working life make this a worthwhile read. A perfect resource for biology teachers."
An instructive and entertaining look at Darwin's "experimentising" and how it can be readily duplicated using mostly simple household tools. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LAST EMPRESS by Da Chen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"A lyrical tale of crossed borders, boundaries and destinies, expertly told."
Nabokov meets Dream of the Red Chamber. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: June 1, 2001

"It seems that the reason for the adaptation is primarily for length—although it's unlikely that the missing hundred pages would have made the difference between a young person deciding to read this or not. (Autobiography. 10-15)"
Adapted from his work published for adults, Colors of the Mountain (1999), this autobiography of a landlord's son growing up as a pariah in his village in the '60s is gripping and funny. Read full book review >