Search Results: "Declan Hughes"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PRICE OF BLOOD by Declan Hughes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 18, 2008

"Chandleresque, and not in entirely good ways. Hughes (The Wrong Kind of Blood, 2006, etc.) tries hard, but the spark isn't there."
An Irish PI searches for a missing person few want found. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE by Declan Hughes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 2014

"Cutting back and forth from Claire to Danny to a Madison police officer to an assassin who's been hired by a shadowy Mr. Big, Hughes sticks so close to each one that he manages to create a threatening, baffling world that feels both kaleidoscopic and claustrophobic."
The creator of private eye Ed Loy (City of Lost Girls, 2010, etc.) spins a stand-alone in which the fallout from a Halloween prank 35 years ago turns a perfect Wisconsin family's life into a nightmare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WRONG KIND OF BLOOD by Declan Hughes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2006

"An overload of backstory burdens long stretches of dialogue in an otherwise promising debut."
A transplanted Irishman goes home to find that Thomas Wolfe pretty much had it right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL THE DEAD VOICES by Declan Hughes
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2009

"An overcomplicated plot redeemed by first-class writing."
Private investigator Ed Loy (The Price of Blood, 2008, etc.) must crack a case the Garda say they cracked 18 years ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRIME ALWAYS PAYS by Declan Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2014

"Don't blink, or you'll miss the latest realignments among criminal conspirators so uniformly energetic and amoral that long before this installment is over, it's hard to tell them apart."
Even though it's been six years since Burke published The Big O (2008), this manic sequel seems to begin five minutes after its predecessor's fade-out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG O by Declan Burke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Imagine Donald Westlake and his alter ego Richard Stark moving to Ireland and collaborating on a screwball noir, and you have some idea of Burke's accomplishment."
A hard-boiled caper goes belly up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST AND THE BLIND by Declan Burke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 2015

"There's much, much more, and readers with the patience to watch as Burke (Crime Always Pays, 2014, etc.) peels back layer after layer will be rewarded with an unholy Chinese box of a thriller. Make that an Irish-German box."
A Donegal novelist and freelance journalist is offered a ghostwriting assignment bound to change his life, if it doesn't end it first. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC NIGHT by Isobelle Carmody
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 28, 2007

"An edgy, beautifully surreal dreamscape perhaps best saved for daytime. (Picture book. 4-6)"
In this moonlit cat adventure first published in Australia as The Wrong Thing (2006), Lee captures the mysterious hush of a thick-with-magic night in ghostly, luminous pastels. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DANIEL MIYARES
by Megan Labrise

For author-illustrator Daniel Miyares, Langston Hughes’s “Dream Variation” (1926) was a revelation.

“To fling my arms wide / In some place of the sun, / To whirl and to dance / Till the white day is done,” begins Hughes’ famous poem, whose two stanzas juxtapose stark and hopeful versions of a day in the life of an African American in the early ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

ON A SCALE FROM IDIOT TO COMPLETE JERK by Alison Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"Though it attempts Diary of a Wimpy Kid, it achieves lengthy science report. Skippable. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Can a scientific study explain jerk-ish behavior, and will it earn J.J. a passing grade? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENCHANTMENT IN THE GARDEN by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

A storybook with echoes of Frances Hodgson Burnett—absentee parents, a lonely girl, an orphan who blossoms while working in a garden, children who meet clandestinely, away from the governess's eyes—from Hughes, who illustrated an edition of The Secret Garden: all the elements of an old-fashioned read, but precious and out-of-date. Read full book review >