Search Results: "Denise D. Cummins"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Her fine work makes the sometimes dry and forbidding field of experimental psychology accessible and even quite engrossing to the layperson. (illustrations, not seen)"
An absorbing survey of knowledge in the relatively neglected area of experimental (as opposed to clinical, or psychotherapeutic) psychology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUSTER GOES TO COWBOY CAMP by Denise Fleming
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2008

Buster the dog is NOT HAPPY that Brown Shoes is taking off for a weekend's R&R and leaving him at Cowboy Camp in the care of Red Boots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIGS LOVE POTATOES by Anika Denise
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2007

"However, with the exception of pig or potato fans, this lacks the pizzazz that would make it a necessary purchase. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Counting pigs and potatoes leads young readers to a feast. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAMA CAT HAS THREE KITTENS by Denise Fleming
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Readers will enjoy following the kittens' purposeful preening, as well as the progress of a mouse that sneaks through the pages until it finds its little ones safe in the nest. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Mama Cat has three kittens: two mimics and one contrarian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1994

"A handsome edition, with especially felicitous typography and design. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A scrupulous note explains that, with ``minimal'' editing, this is the great Russian collector Afanasev's version, ``crafted by Petr Nikolaevich Polevoi (1839-1902), a well-known historian, archaeologist, and Shakespearean scholar.'' In outline, it differs little from Arthur Ransome's text as used in Uri Shulevitz's Caldecott winner (1968); but where Ransome is more literary and humorous, the more straightforward text here is propelled by its energetic cadence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUMPKIN EYE by Denise Fleming
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

All eyes in a Halloween story hour will be riveted to this stellar story of trick-or-treaters enjoying the deliciously scary nature of this special night. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUNCH by Denise Fleming
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

"With large areas of brilliant, subtly modulated color and handsome compositions incorporating boldface type, a beautifully crafted book that's sure to delight young audiences. (Picture book. 0-5)"
Again using her unique medium—brightly colored pulp applied to a screen to make ``handmade paper in which the stenciled images have become a part of the paper itself''—the author of Count (p. 51) creates a lively introduction to the colors: a simple story about a mouse who eats nine fruits and vegetables whose juices leave patches of stain on the appealing little creature, who tracks them across the clean, white pages and then exhibits them for identification in the last illustration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 31, 2001

"Thoroughly researched and solidly written, the simplicity of the text and the inviting format should appeal to middle-grade as well as older readers. (notes, chronology, bibliography, index) (Biography. 8-14)"
An entertaining and intelligent biography of a pioneering woman aviator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"Apt tribute to family endurance in the face of grievous loss."
A wrenching tale of a notorious murder's long echoes for its survivors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OUTSIDE BOY by Jeanine Cummins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2010

"Uneven, but worth reading for its intimate look at a little-known community."
Pavees, or travelers, are a distinctive Irish sub-culture which Cummins celebrates in this uneven first novel, following her memoir A Rip in Heaven (2004). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YELLOWCAKE by Ann Cummins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2007

"Cummins (stories: Red Ant House, 2003) avoids distracting polemics, interweaving the personal and political with quiet authority."
The title refers to the noxious dust produced by a uranium mill in the Four Corners region of the Southwest, where this complex, unusually mature debut novel takes place. Read full book review >