Search Results: "Dennis McDermott"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LISTENING SILENCE by Phyllis Root
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1992

"McDermott's full-page b&w illustrations, dark and dramatic, enhance the attractive open format. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a fantasy based on Native American lore, a young woman confronts her destiny as a healer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILLY MARTIN THE FOX by Mollie Hunter
ANIMALS
Released: April 28, 1994

"A lively and attractive offering. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
As Hunter notes, this is ``a much-condensed but nevertheless faithful retelling'' of a Scottish Highland tale, recorded in Gaelic and published in English in 1860. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLYING SHIP by Andrew Lang
adapted by Andrew Lang, illustrated by Dennis McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"It's just not enough reason to give this rendition preference. (Picture book/folklore. 7-9)"
Aided by a platoon of magically talented companions found along the road, a simpleton has little trouble wresting the hand of a princess away from the grip of her reluctant father in this illustrated edition of a story from The Yellow Fairy Book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OOM RAZOOM by Diane Wolkstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 1991

"A sturdy contribution. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
``Go I know not where, bring back I know not what''—such is the task set Alexis by the king. who hopes to steal Olga, Alexis's lovely wife, for himself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY by Gerald McDermott
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2011

"This final volume in McDermott's sextet of trickster tales is as full of kid appeal and entertaining as the rest and, like them, will power many an energetic read-aloud. (Picture book/folktale. 5-10)"
Monkey wants some mangoes and Crocodile wants some monkey—and neither is about to give up in this traditional Indian trickster tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATION by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Accessible to small children but resonant enough for older ones, reverent and magnificent. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Decades of turning myth into gorgeously imaged picture books culminates in McDermott's powerful rendering of the creation story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABYFACE by Jeanne McDermott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Although not a story to be bestowed upon expectant mothers at baby showers, McDermott's courageous tale will prove riveting to most readers."
The gripping story of science writer and teacher McDermott's first year as the mother of a disabled child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THIS by Alice McDermott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2006

"Genuinely moving yet amorphous, like a remembered fragrance that you can't quite place."
A disarmingly understated tale of mid-to-late-20th-century Long Island Catholics from McDermott, who has come to own this particular literary turf after five penetrating novels and a National Book Award. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VALLEY OF DECISION by Shannon McDermott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 2014

"A solid fantasy that wears its spirituality lightly yet effectively."
In McDemott's (Inspection, 2013, etc.) latest fantasy novel, an embittered warrior leads a revolt against an ethereal enemy enslaving his people and finds himself in a fight for his own soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A fine addition to the body of work by a proven master. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)"
Jabutí, the flute-playing tortoise, may not be as well known in North America as some of his fellow tricksters like Coyote or Ananse, but there are many stories about him in Amazonian folklore, first recorded as long ago as 1875. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZOMO THE RABBIT by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

A rabbit asks the sky god for wisdom, and learns that he must first fool three animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 20, 1974

"McDermott's fusion of primitive costumes, motifs and legend with contemporary design and color sense is highly ambitious — and, in this instance, explosively, elementally beautiful."
The gold, ochre and black of the stylized pueblo, the Boy's transformation from a Kachina-like silhouette into an arrow strong enough to reach his father the Sun and, finally, the explosion of color as Boy enters the Sun's four chambers to confront monster lions, serpents, bees and lightning — all add up to a richer, more kinetic, more functional balance between story and visual effects than were to be found in McDermott's highly praised Anansi the Spider. Read full book review >