Search Results: "Di Toft"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TWILIGHT CIRCUS by Di Toft
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Definitely a continuation rather than a freestanding episode, but the author keeps her ongoing plot galloping along and adds an assortment of marvelous new creatures to the cast. (Fantasy.10-13) "
An old foe sets a deadly trap for two young werewolves in a sequel framed by family reunions and positively festooned with hideous vampires. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLVEN by Di Toft
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2010

"Expect sequels. (Fantasy. 10-13)"
The hamlet of Temple Gurney seems ordinary enough—discounting the odd witch, spooky woods and old manor house with a supersecret laboratory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOCTOR ME DI CIN by Roberto Piumini
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A delightful amusement with lovely and evocative artwork. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Despite his eponymous name, a wise doctor tricks a sick prince into curing himself without herbs or medications. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DI AND I by Peter Lefcourt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1994

"A fun romp, but the humor is sometimes forced, and the book is ultimately more silly than entertaining."
Screenwriter and novelist Lefcourt (The Dreyfus Affair, 1992, etc.) returns with a bizarre comedy in which the Princess of Wales and a Hollywood screenwriter fall in love and open a McDonald's restaurant in California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOLCI DI LOVE by Sarah-Kate Lynch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 26, 2011

"An atypical, sometimes awkward (see the title) version of chick lit which cheerily proposes that two wrongs can make a right."
A betrayed wife collides with two biscuit-baking, elderly Italian sisters who double as matchmakers in a bumpy romantic fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUEEN & DI by Ingrid Seward
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"A well-written, guilt-free treat for devoted royal family-watchers—whose numbers are, of course, legion."
A surprisingly fresh addition to the mountain of biographies of the late Princess of Wales—this one focusing on her relations with the Queen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LA-DI-DA HARE by J. Patrick Lewis
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Bluthenthal's animated illustrations are an excellent complement, in beachcombing colors of sand and surf, convincing in the depiction of a place awash in fresh, salt breezes. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Clever wordplay and a marvelous island bestiary distinguish this rhymed wonder quest from Lewis (Black Swan/White Crow, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIRACLE OF CASTEL DI SANGRO by Joe McGinniss
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"Up to the last 40 pages, an entertaining and often moving read."
This venture into the murky waters of Italian soccer begins as a radical departure for the best-selling journalist McGinnis (The Last Brother, not reviewed, etc.), known more for his true crime volumes than his sports reporting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUISE THE BIG CHEESE AND THE LA-DI-DA SHOES by Elise Primavera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2010

"With numerous sly puns included in the illustrations, this sparkling tale is a treat for Imeldas of all ages. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The indomitable Louise returns, this time in pursuit of a fanciful pair of shoes (Louise the Big Cheese, 2009). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD THAT WE WANT by Kim Michelle Toft
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2005

"A gorgeous look at the interdependence of life on this earth, and a treasure to share with a youngster. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-9)"
In a "house that Jack built" pattern, Toft introduces readers to the many habitats that overlap to support the multitude of life on "the world that we want." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL WONDER AND THE TERRIFIC TWINS by Malorie Blackman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"B&w pencil drawings of all the mishaps. (Fiction. 6-8.)"
Maxine and her younger twin brothers imagine themselves to be superheroes as they confront everyday problems—like how to retrieve their soccer ball from a grouchy neighbor's flowerbed, rescue a cat from a tree, or persuade their mother to let them have a pet. Read full book review >