Search Results: "Diane L. Elliot"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 4, 1998

"Decorated by a glamorous roster of friends and acquaintances (from Andy Warhol to Queen Elizabeth II), this biography is direct and unpretentious, but essentially insubstantial—much like the wrap dress. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Build a better dress and they will come: this is the theme of this celebrity autobiography by designer/jet setter Von Furstenberg. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT by Julie Pearson
by Julie Pearson, illustrated by Manon Gauthier, translated by Erin Woods
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2016

"A needed but problematic offering. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A heartfelt picture book attempts to address the stories of foster children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIANE ARBUS by Arthur Lubow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Despite limitations on research, Lubow sharply captures Arbus' restlessness, pain, and artistic vision."
Photographer Diane Arbus (1923-1971) was addicted to danger, sex, and human oddities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELLIOT ALLAGASH by Simon Rich
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2010

"A high-school romp that John Hughes should be so lucky to direct."
Two outsiders from opposite sides of the tracks join forces to survive that most heinous of limbos: high school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INVENTING ELLIOT by Graham Gardner
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2004

"References throughout to Orwell's 1984 add depth and keep readers thinking of the principles at stake when those with power abuse it. (Fiction. YA)"
Gardner serves up a suspenseful tale of a bullying victim who manages a transformation, not into safety, but into the kingdom of the bullies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELLIOT, FALL FRIENDS by Mike Curato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"A yummy, happy resolution—perfectly delectable to the preschool crowd. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Little Elliot (a small, white pachyderm with pastel polka dots) and his bestie, Mouse, need a respite from the big city's grating sounds, slightly sickening smells, and frenetic pace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELLIOT, BIG FUN by Mike Curato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Gorgeous illustrations and an evocative time period support a somewhat staid story. (Picture book. 4-6)"
The third book featuring Little Elliot, a polka-dot elephant, and Mouse brings them to Coney Island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELLIOT, BIG CITY by Mike Curato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"This feels far more like a parable for adults than a picture book for children, who may also miss the elegance of the New York City images in their dark, soft palette. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The big city is clearly New York, but it's a grayed and sepia city sometime in the late 1940s, judging from the cars and clothing. Read full book review >