Search Results: "Diane Lee Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 4, 1998

"Decorated by a glamorous roster of friends and acquaintances (from Andy Warhol to Queen Elizabeth II), this biography is direct and unpretentious, but essentially insubstantial—much like the wrap dress. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Build a better dress and they will come: this is the theme of this celebrity autobiography by designer/jet setter Von Furstenberg. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON by David Mamet
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Well, folks, we're here to tell you—Wilson isn't even half-vast."
You'll want to clear your sinuses by renting a video of Glengarry Glen Ross or American Buffalo after wrestling with this unruly anti-novel by the noted playwright and remarkably unremarkable writer of fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK STORM COMIN’ by Diane Lee Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"An exciting story written with style. (map, author's note) (Fiction. 10-14)"
On the eve of the Civil War, Colton Wescott is "a boy with a foot in each of two worlds—the black and the white, the slave and the free, the East and the West." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO RIDE THE GODS’ OWN STALLION by Diane Lee Wilson
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"It's gripping, vivid storytelling, and Ti is as strong a presence in the story as any of the human characters. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Another robust, horsey historical tale from the author of I Rode a Horse of Milk White Jade (1998), this one set in and around Nineveh, capital of the Assyrian Empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I RODE A HORSE OF MILK WHITE JADE by Diane Lee Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"While there are some brave moments and dramatic scenes, readers will lose patience with the limping narrative and obvious moral. (glossary) (Fiction. 11-13)"
"Bad luck," plagues 12-year-old Oyuna and her family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON by A. Scott Berg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Readable, authoritative and, most usefully, inspiring."
Accomplished biographer Berg (Lindbergh, 1998, etc.) emphasizes the extraordinary talents of this unlikely president in an impressive, nearly hagiographic account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEE by Tito Perdue
Released: Aug. 15, 1991

"A promising debut."
A first novel that follows an old man, a kind of Old Testament prophet full of books and anger at the age, as he wanders— sometimes violently—through the modern urban world and into his own past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRACKS by Diane Lee Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 13, 2012

"In the end, they ride off into the sunset—too bad it's not credible. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
An interesting historical setting is marred by a morally ambiguous protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAVEN SPEAK by Diane Lee Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 20, 2010

"Classic storytelling. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Asa Coppermane's Viking chieftain father and all the other able-bodied men are away searching for food, her feverish mother is near death and her older brothers are already dead and stacked in one of the barns, awaiting spring thaw for burial. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOODROW WILSON by John Milton Cooper Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 2009

"Cooper exhibits complete command of his materials, a sure knowledge of the man and a nuanced understanding of a presidency almost Shakespearean in its dimensions."
A noted Woodrow Wilson expert comprehensively examines the life and career of America's 28th president. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIANE ARBUS by Arthur Lubow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"Despite limitations on research, Lubow sharply captures Arbus' restlessness, pain, and artistic vision."
Photographer Diane Arbus (1923-1971) was addicted to danger, sex, and human oddities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 27, 1996

"Perhaps this biography, in its lumbering, cumbersome way, might bring a few of these elegant, streamlined, ever inventive works back to the bookstores."
As with many ploddingly obese biographies, there is a thin, sprightly work here aching to be set free. Read full book review >