Search Results: "Diane McWhorter"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A dense, detailed, and insightful history."
From a journalist and member of one of Birmingham's leading families, a vivid, admirably nuanced, and wide-ranging history of the city that became ground zero in the Civil Rights struggle as black children marched, the white establishment wrestled with the need to change, and the Ku Klux Klan engaged in murderous bombings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

This clear-eyed account of the civil-rights movement's most vicious years should be required reading for anyone who thinks that it all began and ended with Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Bone White by Tim McWhorter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 24, 2015

"An intermittently effective suspense tale that should satisfy die-hard horror buffs."
Seeking shelter from a massive rainstorm, two teenagers stumble into a psychopath's hideout and must fight for their lives in McWhorter's (Swallowing the Worm and Other Stories, 2015, etc.) gory debut novel.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 18, 2000

"An important book that forthrightly confronts and questions conventional wisdom."
An impassioned but meticulously argued plea for African Americans to address the three basic problems—identified by the author as separatism, anti-intellectualism, and "a cult of victimology"—largely responsible for "keeping black Americans eternally America's case apart." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORDS ON THE MOVE by John McWhorter
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"As in most of his books, McWhorter proves to be a well-informed and cheerful guide to linguistics."
A brisk look at how and why words change. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALKING BACK, TALKING BLACK by John McWhorter
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"A vibrant separation of an African-American vernacular tradition from the thickets of contemporary racial debate."
A compact, lively defense of the grammatical legitimacy of "Black English." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 2002

"An entertaining, instructive Henry Higgins of a volume: it'll transform readers into enraptured Eliza Doolittles."
A Berkeley linguist conducts a learned, lively tour through the lush garden of human languages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 27, 2003

"As intended, McWhorter raises hackles as he challenges received opinions and entrenched notions."
Rousing essays on the nature of being African-American today and a dissection of currents the author of Losing the Race (2000) finds self-defeating. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 19, 2008

"A sharp pin with which to pop the bloviating balloon of self-important cultural mandarins."
Bracing, though occasionally loosely argued, charge that the much-lauded political promise of hip-hop is at best a sham, and at worst a dangerous placebo that distracts people from enacting constructive change. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 2, 2006

"Take that, Jesse. Whatever the merits of his argument, McWhorter is both fluent and fearless—and sure to catch hell."
Why do African-Americans continue to suffer, despite the successes of the civil-rights movement? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 4, 2011

"Turgid at times, but mostly eye-opening, even liberating."
Linguist and New Republic contributing editor McWhorter (Linguistics and Western Civilization/Columbia Univ.; Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold History of English, 2008, etc.) returns with a discussion of what languages are, and some insightful thoughts about why we view some as "primitive" and others as "advanced." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TROUBLE WITH WISHES by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A classy retelling of a classic myth highlighting the meaning of real companionship. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this version of the Greek myth Pygmalion, Stanley interprets "notions of perfect beauty and misguided love." Read full book review >