Search Results: "Diane Ravitch"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 29, 2000

"An incisive examination of failed utopian schemes in the classroom."
Former Assistant Secretary of Education Ravitch (The Troubled Crusade, 1983) recounts a dispiriting record of pitched debates and failed reform attempts in the American educational system over the last century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 18, 2013

"For policymakers, parents and anyone concerned about the dismantling of one of our democracy's great institutions."
A noted education authority launches a stout defense of the public school system and a sharp attack on the so-called reformers out to wreck them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 21, 2003

"Of tremendous importance to parents, educational reformers, and anyone concerned with the myriad failings of the present culture."
Johnny and Janie can't read, can't find the Pacific on a map, can't even think—all thanks to official censorship that "represents a systemic breakdown of our ability to educate the next generation." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SO MUCH TO DO by Richard Ravitch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 29, 2014

"For policy wonks and readers with a particular interest in New York."
An exemplary public servant recounts his eventful life at the intersection of business and politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TROUBLE WITH WISHES by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A classy retelling of a classic myth highlighting the meaning of real companionship. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this version of the Greek myth Pygmalion, Stanley interprets "notions of perfect beauty and misguided love." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2006

"Her classic illustrations capture body language and facial expression to a T. A wonderful celebration of the end of a school year, ideal for preparing kindergartners. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Gilbert and his friends return to delight their fans in this look at their last day of school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIAR, LIAR, PANTS ON FIRE by Diane DeGroat
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Readers who have enjoyed Gilbert's earlier exploits will look forward to more from this remarkably human opossum. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Using the story of George Washington and the cherry tree as inspiration, school children realize that the lessons they learn about honesty extend beyond the skit they perform. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUMPELSTILTSKIN'S DAUGHTER by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

"Those who like Babette Cole's send- ups will find plenty of giggles in this reworking. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A feminist revision of Rumpelstiltskin, in which the small man and the miller's daughter marry and raise a daughter, Hope, who finds herself in the same room of straw her mother once faced. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUCK'S TOOTH by Diane  Kredensor
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 12, 2015

"Lots of sight words, full-color cartoon illustrations, easy-to-read speech bubbles, humor, and lots of likable characters add up to a surefire hit for new readers. (Early reader. 4-8)"
Buck is a beaver with just one front tooth—but it's a big one! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST ONE IN IS A ROTTEN EGG! by Diane DeGroat
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"DeGroat's artwork and story have a benign, empathetic cast to them, so the moral eases into the proceedings without becoming heavy handed. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Having been the principal in ten heartening, gently didactic books from deGroat, Gilbert is a familiar face by now: He's the one who looks like Albert Einstein, had Einstein been a young opossum. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAND-NEW PENCILS, BRAND-NEW BOOKS by Diane DeGroat
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"DeGroat's watercolors—with their easygoing charm —evolve from expectant to relaxed as the kids find what first-graders have always found: School rarely meets their dire predictions, and even kids like Lewis have their time-honored place. (Picture book. 4-7)"
DeGroat ably threads her way through some well-trod ground: the first day of school. Read full book review >