Search Results: "Diane Stanley"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"An excellent introduction that will lead older children (and adults) to the music. (author's notes, chronology, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 6-10)"
At three, Mozart heard his older sister play the clavier and copied her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOAN OF ARC by Diane Stanley
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

From Stanley (Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter, 1997, etc.), a sympathetic biography that is also a straightforward affair, captured in gemlike illustrations that feign a Book of Hours touch—though many are drenched in piety—recounting the story of Joan's life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICHELANGELO by Diane Stanley
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"It deserves heavy representation in home, school, and public library collections. (Biography. 9+)"
Stanley is the premier creator of handsome, artistically ambitious, and factually accurate illustrated books that explore and explain the lives and times of major figures throughout history (Joan of Arc, 1998; Leonardo Da Vinci, 1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TROUBLE WITH WISHES by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"A classy retelling of a classic myth highlighting the meaning of real companionship. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
In this version of the Greek myth Pygmalion, Stanley interprets "notions of perfect beauty and misguided love." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUMPELSTILTSKIN'S DAUGHTER by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

"Those who like Babette Cole's send- ups will find plenty of giggles in this reworking. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A feminist revision of Rumpelstiltskin, in which the small man and the miller's daughter marry and raise a daughter, Hope, who finds herself in the same room of straw her mother once faced. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEONARDO DA VINCI by Diane Stanley
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"More than Leonardo's genius, this book captures the caprice time and fate plays on even the gifted, so that what readers finally admire in Leonardo are not his creations, but his ideas. (pronunciation guide, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 7+)"
He might be called an eccentric and a dreamer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALADIN by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Though this will leave readers with some questions (Stanley provides no references for some of the more interesting tidbits that they may be curious about), it brings this hero to light for a young audience, who may only be familiar with this period from the Christian history. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Stanley, in her usual style (Michelangelo, 2000, etc.), gives a brief, lavishly illustrated account of this famous Muslim leader who united his people against the Christian Crusaders of the 12th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIANT AND THE BEANSTALK by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"A must for all fractured-fairytale collections. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Stanley has again managed an inspired spin on an old fairy tale, telling Jack and the Beanstalk from the not-so-fierce and much-teased giant Otto's point of view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDIE AND THE THREE BEARS by Diane Stanley
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"So is the tone of this imaginative update. (Picture book/folktale. 6-8)"
Stanley reinvents another familiar tale, this one in a modern setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAVING SKY by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Inspiring. (Thriller. 10-14)"
In Stanley's latest, the post-9/11 future has taken a dark turn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SILVER BOWL by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2011

"A most worthy and enjoyable entry in the 'feisty female' fantasy genre. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Veteran Stanley concocts a delicious blend of familiar fairy-tale motifs and intriguing, well-rounded characters to create an engaging fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A TIME APART by Diane Stanley
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"The specifics of the Iron Age experiment are compelling, but the ending, as hasty in its pacing as the set-up was leisurely, is disappointingly feeble. (Fiction. 11- 14)"
Her mother's cancer surgery and anticipated follow-up treatment is the catalyst for Ginny's trip to England, where she will live with her professor father, Hugh; she hasn't seen him in a year, and hasn't lived with him since her parents divorced. Read full book review >