Search Results: "Dominic Barth"


BOOK REVIEW

DOMINIC by Kathleen Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 22, 1991

"It all moves along at a lively clip."
A fourth-century A.D. young dwarf narrates his adventures— some fairly hideous—here and there within the disintegrating Roman Empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOMINIC by William Steig
Released: Jan. 1, 1972

"To know Dominic is to share his high spirits, and the clean perfection of Steig's prose enlarges the pleasure."
Dominic, a lively and expansive hound, leaves home to see more of the world and is soon engaged in a series of wide open encounters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE'S STORE AT THE SHORE by Francine Basséde
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"In addition, there is some good-humored industriousness involvedthe notion that work can be fun, perhaps especially when it is done among baguettes and the seaside lavender of France. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A counting book with the tang of the south of France; animating the spare text are deceptively simple watercolors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOOKA SAVES THE DAY by Gilles Eduar
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Vibrant illustrations and small touches lift this story from the ordinary, and establish a magical world akin to that of Babar—a world that readers will respond to happily. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Despite the preliminarily disenchanting premise of the different-one-who-wins, Eduar, with ebullient illustrations that blaze with tropical scenery and color, sweeps readers into the saga of how Jooka-zay-kajoo's search for his unique identity leads him to unity with the crocodiles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANTA AND THE THREE BEARS by Dominic Catalano
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A satisfying sugarplum for holiday story times with a wide range of children, from preschoolers through second graders. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Original Christmas stories don't grow on pine trees, but this story of Papa, Mama, and Baby (Polar) Bear trying out the food, chairs, and bed in a cozy cottage at the North Pole strikes a balance that is just right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIGHT WAY TO LOSE A WAR by Dominic Tierney
NON-FICTION
Released: June 2, 2015

"Tierney is clearly not optimistic about real change in the near future, but his useful book's coda offers some interesting long-term strategies to avoid endless war in the future."
A manifesto that offers alternative stratagems to waging war in a changing geopolitical landscape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIGHT AND DISTANT SHORES by Dominic Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"Beautifully researched and ripe with symbolism—an enthralling narrative peopled by characters both exotic and real."
Written with extraordinary literary grace, Smith's (The Beautiful Miscellaneous, 2007, etc.) third novel gleams as a gem of evocative historical fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DISCO BOY by Dominic Knight
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2010

"A light-hearted celebration of things uncool."
Australian TV writer Knight, a founder of comedy troupe The Chaser, abandons hard satire for softer emotions in his affectionate debut about a beta male finding his way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF TEN NIGHTS AND A NIGHT by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 2004

"Best for those who consider Barth an essential contemporary writer—whose numbers may be, well, 'contracting.'"
The storytelling urge, in old age and under duress, as seen in the veteran postmodernist's latest collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"A dilettante par excellence, Barth has read intelligently and indiscriminately enough to have something interesting to say at almost any time."
Like The Friday Book (1984), a collection of eclectic and irregularly insightful essays by the noted novelist—an admixture of reminiscence, manifesto, and review. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 18, 1984

"Primarily for those involved in the philosophy-of-fiction quarrels, then, along with passionate fans of Barth's novels and stories."
Lectures, introductions, symposium contributions, and other miscellaneous pieces (written on Friday mornings)—most of which end up as arguments for Barth's "postmodernist" approach to fiction, with extensive references to his own work (especially the numbing LETTERS). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOST IN THE FUNHOUSE by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 1968

No American writer under forty is as lavishly admired as John Barth. Read full book review >