Search Results: "Dominic Barth"


BOOK REVIEW

GEORGE'S STORE AT THE SHORE by Francine Basséde
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"In addition, there is some good-humored industriousness involvedthe notion that work can be fun, perhaps especially when it is done among baguettes and the seaside lavender of France. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A counting book with the tang of the south of France; animating the spare text are deceptively simple watercolors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOOKA SAVES THE DAY by Gilles Eduar
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Vibrant illustrations and small touches lift this story from the ordinary, and establish a magical world akin to that of Babar—a world that readers will respond to happily. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Despite the preliminarily disenchanting premise of the different-one-who-wins, Eduar, with ebullient illustrations that blaze with tropical scenery and color, sweeps readers into the saga of how Jooka-zay-kajoo's search for his unique identity leads him to unity with the crocodiles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE THREE ROADS MEET by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 21, 2005

"Better titled Where Three Roads Diverge—but do little more than divert."
Like the NBA-winning Chimera (1972), three linked novellas about sex, heroism and writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SABBATICAL by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 24, 1982

"But it's an intriguing, touching spectacle nonetheless—the avant-garde meets banal-romance—and it's certainly Barth's most accessible novel since The Sot-Weed Factor."
Some critics have long suspected that the "meta-fiction" experimentalists (those who erect a barricade of cold, ornate literary devices between story and reader) are really the least tough-minded writers around, that they often use parody and formalism to fend off—or cover up—the thin sentimentality at the heart of their work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY ALMOST CERTAINLY REAL IMAGINARY JESUS by Kelly Barth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"At times, the narrative becomes dull as Barth veers down paths few readers will find of interest—e.g., a discussion of her good credit report when she applied for a home loan. Apart from such divergences, however, the author provides an intriguing life story."
Learning how to be gay and Christian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WEEK IN WINTER by Barth Landor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"A highly effective—and affecting—tale, made all the more powerful by a simple and unvarnished telling that allows the story to unfold naturally and without self-consciousness. An impressive start."
A taut, rather grim but strong debut: a story about the futile efforts of a Foreign Service officer to save a family of Jewish refugees in a war-torn country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANTA AND THE THREE BEARS by Dominic Catalano
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"A satisfying sugarplum for holiday story times with a wide range of children, from preschoolers through second graders. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Original Christmas stories don't grow on pine trees, but this story of Papa, Mama, and Baby (Polar) Bear trying out the food, chairs, and bed in a cozy cottage at the North Pole strikes a balance that is just right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERY THIRD THOUGHT by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Idiosyncratic, outlandish—and a good read."
Barth delivers a slim postmodern novel about—what else?—a postmodern novelist experiencing a series of uncanny coincidences and visions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST VOYAGE OF SOMEBODY THE SAILOR by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1990

"A thin story in a very fat book."
Barth is back with another big (544-page), bawdy, and "postmodernist" book, replete with the usual metafictional conceits, in which the "New Journalist" hero, a contemporary Scheherazade of sorts, likes to swap tales with the legendary Sinbad the Sailor, while trying to get his bearings, both metaphorically and literally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATHICS by Richard Barth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 26, 1993

"Lots of social-injustice angst, lots of local color, but little mystery—except for the disappearance of a once charming, low-keyed heroine turned pushy and self-righteous."
Margaret Binton (Deadly Climate, 1988, etc.) is once again embroiled in a just cause, along with the cluster of friends who share the benches on the grassy triangle at Broadway and 82nd St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOT-WEED FACTOR by John Barth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 19, 1960

"However, the literary models Mr. Barth has chosen give him ample scope for pornography and scatology and all the archaism will not disguise the elements and incidents of disgust and distaste which were certainly prominent in his earlier modern allegory, The End of the Road."
Ebenezer Cooke, an innocent like Candide, was born in Maryland but raised in 17th century England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Welcome tension arrives in the form of a cat, who has been seen in the background; it pounces into the party scene with lethal accuracy, but carries off the bagpipe rather than the player. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The subtitle refers not to a theatrical play, but a simple, amiable retelling of the folk song, divided into six sections. Read full book review >