Search Results: "Donald Antrim"


BOOK REVIEW

ELECT MR. ROBINSON FOR A BETTER WORLD by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But Antrim's failure to orchestrate his flashy set-pieces leaves the impression of a first draft, albeit from a promising new talent with a wonderfully keen ear. (First serial to Harper's and The Paris Review.)"
Civilization's thin crust tears again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VERIFICATIONIST by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2000

"Those who persevere will find themselves, like Tom, seeing matters in a distinctly new way."
Antrim's novels (The Hundred Brothers, 1997, etc.) are so hilariously inventive, so audacious, and so full of a unique blend of ideas and pratfalls that it's hard to find another contemporary writer to compare him to: Pynchon on lithium? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EMERALD LIGHT IN THE AIR by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"A deceptively spiky set of meditations on romantic failure."
Couples unravel and anxieties are revealed in this batch of urbane, wry and interior stories enlivened by Antrim's talent for gamesmanship with words. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AFTERLIFE by Donald Antrim
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2006

"A luminous meditation on the past, the enigmas of family and the tangled mystery of love."
An elegant memoir about the author's turbulent relationship with his erratic, irascible, alcoholic and otherwise maddening artist-mother—who could sometimes be nurturing, even smothering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUNDRED BROTHERS by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Another unique work from the most delightfully idiosyncratic of young American writers."
Surrealism is alive and well in the antic universe of Antrim's fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMMUNITY by Taylor Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2015

"If Bret Easton Ellis wrote a biothriller."
A nasty post-pandemic New York, with plenty of Patrón tequila and cocaine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEADMASTER RITUAL by Taylor Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 9, 2007

"For those who can swallow the premise, the rest goes down more easily."
Though the sinister dynamics of boarding school have long proven fertile ground for fiction, the political premise of this debut strains credulity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOSTS OF THE SAN JUAN by Donald Willerton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2016

"A miss. (Adventure. 10-14)"
A new middle-grade adventure series kicks off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRE ROAD by Donald Anderson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"While the material can be repetitive, Anderson's tales are nevertheless focused and sometimes extremely moving in the manner of one of his primary influences, the late Andre Dubus."
First time out, a writer runs circles around himself sifting through memories in this linked collection of stories (winner of the John Simmons Award) that builds into something like, but isn't quite, a novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Probably too pessimistic on reconciling conservation with a market economy, but informed and lucid about how we've lost ground in the fight to save our natural resources."
Sixteen thoughtful essays that examine the present and future implications of America's past relationship to the land—and that draw, as Worster (American History/University of Kansas; Rivers of Empire, 1986, etc.) puts it, a ``picture of the human past that is radically unlike anything you will find in the standard undergraduate history textbooks.'' In these pieces (some of which appeared originally in academic journals and books), Worster speaks with awe of the ``search to discover a less reductive, less ecologically and spiritually nihilistic, less grasping kind of materialism.'' In this spirit, reminiscent of Thoreau and Joseph Wood Krutch (one of the author's early inspirations), Worster sounds deeply skeptical over the prospect that a market economy can ever be compatible with responsible stewardship of this country's natural resources: His own preference is for an environmentalism ``that talks about ethics and aesthetics rather than about resources and economics.'' Not surprisingly, given these views, Worster throws a wet rag over the concept of ``sustained development''; hails an American conservation revolution that views the land as an interdependent ecosystem; and calls for an end to all federal subsidies of western irrigation projects. Read full book review >