Search Results: "Donald Byrd"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HARLEM NUTCRACKER by Donald Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Authors' note. (Picture book. 8-11)"
Forget the Sugar Plum Fairy and those syrupy waltzes you can't get out of your head each December. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELECTRIC BEN by Robert Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2012

"A work of breadth and energy, just like its subject; engaging and brimming with appeal for a wide audience. (Biography. 8-14)"
A beautifully realized labor of love and affection brings to life one of our brightest founding fathers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: July 1, 2005

Paired with stylized, full-bleed views of strong-featured figures in classical Greek dress, and generally posed in profile, Byrd retells a melded tale that includes not only Theseus's birth, early feats and battle with the Minotaur, but also the imprisonment and flight of Daedalus and Icarus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS by Robert Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"A fine first introduction to an age-old tale of travel, adventure, and heroism. (Mythology. 6-9)"
Murder, intrigue, betrayal, patricide, regicide, and more constitute Jason's epic quest for the Golden Fleece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAINT FRANCIS AND THE CHRISTMAS DONKEY by Robert Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Lovely. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Inspired by the story of St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAVE CHICKEN LITTLE by Robert Byrd
retold by Robert Byrd, illustrated by Robert Byrd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2014

"A handsome, most welcome addition to the now–sadly neglected, too-little–published literature of folk and fairy tales. (Picture book/folk tale. 4-7)"
Byrd retells the familiar tale of folly and trickery, adding some outsize bravery and a happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEONARDO, BEAUTIFUL DREAMER by Robert Byrd
BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 1, 2003

"His twin regards for subject and reader make this offering a winner. (author's note, timeline, bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
As thorough an exploration of Leonardo's achievements as can be wrought in picture-book format, this offering takes every opportunity to give the original Renaissance Man his own voice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LONE STAR NOIR by Bobby Byrd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Part of a geographically oriented noir fiction anthology series that began in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir and now includes over 40 more, including Miami, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Moscow and Istanbul Noir. Wait for your town."
Noir and Texas link 14 previously unpublished stories—two first-rate, the rest not bad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACKSON by Max Byrd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"But the zeitgeist is embodied to perfection, and the result is a truly, and substantially, entertaining tale."
In some ways a sequel to his well-researched Jefferson (1993), Byrd's latest is a superior novel to that earlier effort—lusty and lively in its view of the American political scene, circa 1828, yet also keenly aware of the underlying issues gripping the nation as it expanded westward. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"A synopsis of the MacCoul legend, source notes, and a pronunciation guide appear at the end of the book. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)"
This visually attractive treatment of the early Celtic folktale, in which Finn and his crafty wife foil the menacing giant, Cucullin, is musical in its wording and graced with a fine sprinkling of old Irish artifacts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHOOTING THE SUN by Max Byrd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2004

"Terrific adventures. Splendid details."
Intrepid early Victorians trek the American desert to photograph a total eclipse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OPAL CAVERN by S.G. Byrd
Released: May 3, 2012

"A nonpreaching testament to the power that comes from knowing and accepting yourself."
A lyrical tale that demonstrates how a voyage of self-discovery can be more important than an outer journey. Read full book review >