Search Results: "Donald McCaig"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"His collection is uneven, but, at its best, pure and moving. (Twenty halftones—not seen.)"
Essays on rural life by NPR commentator McCaig (Eminent Dogs, Dangerous Men, 1991; Nop's Trials, 1984, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. AND MRS. DOG by Donald McCaig
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2013

"A straightforward but unremarkable book for dog lovers or those considering a dog."
Novelist and essayist McCaig (The Dog Wars: How the Border Collie Battled the American Kennel Club, 2007, etc.) chronicles his experiences training sheepdogs for companionship and competition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CANAAN by Donald McCaig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 19, 2007

"A husk of a novel; busy, but without cumulative power."
In the wake of the Civil War, blacks and whites struggle to make sense of their changed lives; out West, Indians struggle against the Washitu (whites). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUTH'S JOURNEY by Donald McCaig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Ruth laments, 'I done lost most them I loved, and most my beloveds die ugly,' but this is the tale of Mammy, not Ruth."
Authorized by the Margaret Mitchell estate, this historical novel takes up the story of Mammy, one of the most beloved minor characters in Gone With the Wind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACOB'S LADDER by Donald McCaig
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"Too bad that the few Federals are ciphers, suggestive of the prevailing one-sidedness that holds this often powerful tale from an epic breadth and dilutes its impact."
A large, ambitious, carefully researched novel tracing the impact of the Civil War on a Virginia slave-owning family, their neighbors, and their slaves—with enough melodrama and subplots to fill several books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOP'S HOPE by Donald McCaig
Released: May 11, 1994

"His landscapes, whether of the Mississippi Delta, the truck stops along the highway, the life of the American West, or the human heart, are vivid and true."
This finely written sequel to McCaig's popular Nop's Trials (1984) follows Penny Burkeholder and her unique Border Collie, Nop's offering, Hope. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DONALD TRUMP by Jill Sherman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2017

"A prefab profile that will be outdated long before it becomes available. (source notes, timeline, further reading, index) (Biography. 10-12)"
A quick scan of the recently elected chief executive's family, background, and campaign. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 12, 2002

"Intelligent, thoughtful, and deliciously gossipy: a must for anyone interested in book publishing."
Charming WWII-era letters exchanged by the founders of Random House. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Voters ready to pull the trigger one way or another probably won't be swayed by these revelations, but they are highly damning indeed."
The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist takes aim at his longtime bête noire, "a modern P.T. Barnum selling tickets to a modern variation of the Feejee Mermaid." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF AFRICA by Isak Dinesen
Released: March 1, 1937

"Anecdotal — incidental — in character, but it is the manner of telling that gives it such rare charm, the fluency and case and delightful with and subtlety, which characterized her Seven Gothic Tales."
The author of Seven Gothic Tales — presents here reminiscences of twelve years on a coffee farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHURCH OF GOLF by Spencer Stephens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2014

"An odd but entertaining novel of unexpected redemption."
Stephens outlines a washed-up golden boy's second chance at enlightenment in this debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIGMAMA'S by Donald  Crews
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 1991

"A grand alternative to the plethora of predictable books about white kids visiting grandparents on stereotypical family farms. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Beginning with the ride on the old Southern Railway car ("colored" says the sign on the wall), the sights, sounds, and warm delights of a summer visit to Grandma in Crews's own childhood—a three-day trip from somewhere up north. Read full book review >