Search Results: "Donald Worster"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1993

"Probably too pessimistic on reconciling conservation with a market economy, but informed and lucid about how we've lost ground in the fight to save our natural resources."
Sixteen thoughtful essays that examine the present and future implications of America's past relationship to the land—and that draw, as Worster (American History/University of Kansas; Rivers of Empire, 1986, etc.) puts it, a ``picture of the human past that is radically unlike anything you will find in the standard undergraduate history textbooks.'' In these pieces (some of which appeared originally in academic journals and books), Worster speaks with awe of the ``search to discover a less reductive, less ecologically and spiritually nihilistic, less grasping kind of materialism.'' In this spirit, reminiscent of Thoreau and Joseph Wood Krutch (one of the author's early inspirations), Worster sounds deeply skeptical over the prospect that a market economy can ever be compatible with responsible stewardship of this country's natural resources: His own preference is for an environmentalism ``that talks about ethics and aesthetics rather than about resources and economics.'' Not surprisingly, given these views, Worster throws a wet rag over the concept of ``sustained development''; hails an American conservation revolution that views the land as an interdependent ecosystem; and calls for an end to all federal subsidies of western irrigation projects. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHRINKING THE EARTH by Donald Worster
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 2016

"A bracing, intelligent survey of wealth become immiseration, essential for students of environmental history."
Eminent historian Worster (Emeritus, American History/Univ. of Kansas; A Passion for Nature: The Life of John Muir, 2008, etc.) offers a concise, often elegiac account of the end of the American centuries.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIGMAMA'S by Donald  Crews
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 1991

"A grand alternative to the plethora of predictable books about white kids visiting grandparents on stereotypical family farms. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Beginning with the ride on the old Southern Railway car ("colored" says the sign on the wall), the sights, sounds, and warm delights of a summer visit to Grandma in Crews's own childhood—a three-day trip from somewhere up north. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHORTCUT by Donald  Crews
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 1992

"A breathless tour-de-force for train lovers of any age. (Picture book. 5-8)"
In a return to Bigmama's (1991) small Florida community for a second story based on Crews's childhood memories, a group of children walking through a narrow railroad cut have to dive into the brambles when an unexpected train rockets past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: June 15, 2008

"Could be useful in classroom discussions on bullying. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
When Boy's adoptive grandmother Galifalia dies, he goes to the Luck Dragon compound and begs admittance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 11, 1999

"A safe collection, seldom veering from the canon. (index) (Poetry. 9-11)"
Hall (The Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America, 1985, etc.), offers up a chestnut-flavored alternative for younger readers, matching roughly contemporary illustrations to one or two selections from each of 57 American poets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THOMAS MANN by Donald Prater
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1995

"True illumination, however, awaits someone who will take these two aspects together and add the missing ingredient: imaginative spark."
This elegant but overly cautious study of Mann concentrates on narrating how the Nobel Prizewinning German novelist, caught in the mid-20th century's maelstroms, stepped forward to become a spokesman for enlightened humanism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2001

"As before, readers will come away sharing the conviction of Conan Doyle's earliest audience that Victorian England would have been both fairer and more exciting if Sherlock Holmes really had existed."
Now it can be told: Sherlock Holmes starred in still more real-life adventures, bringing to book such varied miscreants as the serial poisoner Dr. Thomas Neill Cream and the brides-in-the-bath killer George Joseph Smith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 5, 1996

"How sad that this book that might have taught us so much about today's paranoid populism turned out to be of so little value. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
All the facts about one of the Depression era's most controversial and influential figures—but little understanding of his motives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCING IN THE DARK by Donald Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 17, 1994

Undaunted by the news that three of shady Sonny Tarrant's intimates have just been murdered, petty con Johnny McIver—and his mistress and frequent photographic subject Solitaire (nÇe Sally Brown)—plot to empty out Tarrant's safe, succeeding to their sorrow: When McIver turns down an offer from a Tarrant underling to buy back the hot ú5 notes at a steep discount, he finds himself abandoned by the money-changer who'd promised him more, framed for the murder of Solitaire, and on the run from the police as well as Tarrant. Read full book review >