Search Results: "Doris Haddock"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 2001

"A moving reminder of the power of the human will."
A touching first-person account of a doughty political activist who walked from California to Washington, D.C., to promote campaign-finance reform. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DORIS THE BOOKASAURUS by Diana Murray
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 4, 2017

"As with most books about the awesomeness of reading, this is most likely to appeal to children who are already excited about books, but it makes for an agreeable affirmation. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Doris—a light-blue cartoon dinosaur who adores reading books—eventually wins over her skeptical, action-oriented brothers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSIDERING DORIS DAY by Tom Santopietro
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2007

"The author's writing is rough—the apt word, the eloquent phrase and a consistent tone elude him—but his perceptions will send readers to Day's CDs and DVDs for an overdue re-take."
This critique of Day's career shows that the major American icon was also a major American talent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 23, 1994

First novel about an unemployed live-at-home college grad, his psyche ``tortured by overthought'' (not to mention drugs and booze), who decides to murder his father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRANDMOTHERS by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"When you're dealing with an author whose track record spans a half-century and paradigm-altering works like The Golden Notebook, it's too easy to simply praise another excellent effort. Where is this woman's Nobel Prize?"
Four novellas demonstrating that 84-year-old author (The Sweetest Dream, 2002, etc.) still boasts a range and power few writers half her age can muster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEN, IN THE WORLD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"Isn't it about time this woman received serious Nobel Prize consideration? Few, if any, living writers can have explored so many forbidding fictional worlds with such passion and conviction."
Far from resting on her laurels, Lessing—who has been publishing for 50 years, and goes from strength to strength—offers this bleak monitory sequel to her harrowing The Fifth Child (1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARA AND DANN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"She isn't a stylist, and she takes no prisoners, but this writer remains one of contemporary fiction's genuine thinkers and visionaries, and it would be folly to ignore her."
Lessing's 22nd novel, a dystopian allegory set in "Ifrik" (formerly Africa) thousands of years hence, is a ponderous, hectoring, fascinating second cousin to her Memoirs of a Survivor (1975) and The Four-Gated City (1969) (and quite reminiscent, incidentally, of Norman Mailer's similarly forbidding Ancient Evenings). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 10, 1998

A disjointed but provocative account of a spiritual journey. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHARP TEETH OF LOVE by Doris Betts
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 9, 1997

"A pair of twentysomething lovers refreshingly reach out beyond themselves to act like grown-ups in a novel that succeeds in spite of itself."
An appealing story about love between a recovering anorexic and a deaf would-be pastor barely survives veteran novelist Betts's (Souls Raised From the Dead, 1994, etc.) awkward flirtation with significance as she introduces a ghost and the battle at Waco. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOULS RAISED FROM THE DEAD by Doris Betts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 1994

"Still, guaranteed to exercise the tear ducts."
The first novel by Betts (Heading West, 1981) in over ten years indulges in the clichÇs of domestic melodrama—a divorced couple, the illness of their only child, the burden and joy of non- nuclear families—but it's all done in an inviting Southern voice. Read full book review >