Search Results: "Doris Lessing"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GRANDMOTHERS by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"When you're dealing with an author whose track record spans a half-century and paradigm-altering works like The Golden Notebook, it's too easy to simply praise another excellent effort. Where is this woman's Nobel Prize?"
Four novellas demonstrating that 84-year-old author (The Sweetest Dream, 2002, etc.) still boasts a range and power few writers half her age can muster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEN, IN THE WORLD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"Isn't it about time this woman received serious Nobel Prize consideration? Few, if any, living writers can have explored so many forbidding fictional worlds with such passion and conviction."
Far from resting on her laurels, Lessing—who has been publishing for 50 years, and goes from strength to strength—offers this bleak monitory sequel to her harrowing The Fifth Child (1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARA AND DANN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"She isn't a stylist, and she takes no prisoners, but this writer remains one of contemporary fiction's genuine thinkers and visionaries, and it would be folly to ignore her."
Lessing's 22nd novel, a dystopian allegory set in "Ifrik" (formerly Africa) thousands of years hence, is a ponderous, hectoring, fascinating second cousin to her Memoirs of a Survivor (1975) and The Four-Gated City (1969) (and quite reminiscent, incidentally, of Norman Mailer's similarly forbidding Ancient Evenings). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD TERRORIST by Doris Lessing
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 25, 1985

"Altogether, this is a book which is strong as a diagnostic study of political motivation—and stronger still as an uncannily authentic character-study."
In her first signed novel since the mythical Canopus in Argos series, Lessing returns to reality—and to her considerable gifts for social observation and vivid characterization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE, AGAIN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"Love, Again is a triumphant vindication of her literary method."
A probing and provocative examination of the experience of love as the mind and body approach old age, by the eminent British author best known for The Golden Notebook, her classic depiction of woman's fate (which this new novel intermittently evokes and resembles). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1992

"Always the fair-minded realist, Leasing isn't overly optimistic about the future, but her sympathetic account of Zimbabwe's struggle to forge a common destiny is most worthwhile."
Leasing, once a "Prohibited Immigrant" barred from her childhood homeland of Rhodesia by its white minority government, returns to what is now Zimbabwe—and in inimitably forthright style records her impressions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1992

"No warm and fuzzy feelings here, only bracing truths—but then that's what Lessing has always done best."
In a new collection, Lessing (The Fifth Child, 1988, etc.) again demonstrates the formidable intelligence and lucid vision that make her writing so distinctive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 17, 1981

"So: perhaps the least ambitious or demanding of Lessing's visionary parables—but one with moments of great, dirge-like, roughly poetic power."
The fourth novel in Lessing's Canopus in Argus series is the shortest, the simplest, and (though frequently given over to long, lyric/philosophical monologues) the most fable-like. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 1980

"Demanding and uningratiating, then, but—like previous Canopus volumes—worth the effort of readers attuned to the very biggest questions."
After a digression into sexual politics (The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four, and Five), Lessing's science-fiction cycle returns to the broad sociological preoccupations of Shikasta (1979)—in which we learned of the Canopean Empire's benevolent, triumphant, yet doomed experiments with primates on Colonised Planet 5, Shikasta. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL PERSONAL VOICE by Doris Lessing
Released: Sept. 26, 1974

"All in all, both controversially and reconcilably, a stimulus, an illumination, a pleasure."
Assorted insights and opinions dom assorted book reviews, essays, interviews including a new preface to The Golden Notebook which redefines Doris Lessing's best known book from several facets (which she claims eluded most critics) and not necessarily as a pro-feminist statement (even if Anna did say — did she not — that the real revolution of our time is that of "women against men"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLEFT by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2007

"A dark parable, powerful yet baffling."
One of postcolonial fiction's brightest lights makes mythic the battle of the sexes. Read full book review >