Search Results: "Doris Lessing"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HABIT OF LOVING by Doris Lessing
Released: Jan. 1, 1957

"An audience- while deserved- may be difficult to assure."
A collection of short stories, always able and sometimes notable, range from England to Africa to the continent, from lighter sketches to soberer commentaries on beaten, broken lives, and are distinguished by their quietly perspicacious view of human existence and experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL PERSONAL VOICE by Doris Lessing
Released: Sept. 26, 1974

"All in all, both controversially and reconcilably, a stimulus, an illumination, a pleasure."
Assorted insights and opinions dom assorted book reviews, essays, interviews including a new preface to The Golden Notebook which redefines Doris Lessing's best known book from several facets (which she claims eluded most critics) and not necessarily as a pro-feminist statement (even if Anna did say — did she not — that the real revolution of our time is that of "women against men"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1992

"No warm and fuzzy feelings here, only bracing truths—but then that's what Lessing has always done best."
In a new collection, Lessing (The Fifth Child, 1988, etc.) again demonstrates the formidable intelligence and lucid vision that make her writing so distinctive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 17, 1981

"So: perhaps the least ambitious or demanding of Lessing's visionary parables—but one with moments of great, dirge-like, roughly poetic power."
The fourth novel in Lessing's Canopus in Argus series is the shortest, the simplest, and (though frequently given over to long, lyric/philosophical monologues) the most fable-like. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 4, 1980

"But there is a sweetness and generosity about this work not quite like anything she has done; like the difficult but moving Shikasta, it seems to encompass and summarize dozens of her previous concerns with a sort of piercing magnanimity."
This brief fable, the second work in the science-fiction series begun with Shikasta (1979), is bound to be read as a return to the portrayals of sexual politics responsible for Lessing's initial vogue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"Others will find it a painful, revelatory, fascinating book, and while Doris Lessing is not as glittering a writer as Simone de Beauvoir, some of her concerns may occasion the comparison and suggest a market."
Doris Lessing has been established in England, rather than here, as one of the most interesting writers since the '40's and this remarkable book, unquestionably her major work to date, reflects a savage intelligence which does not exclude passion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SWEETEST DREAM by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 10, 2002

"Lessing's best in years. She remains, in vigorous old age, one of the world's essential writers."
The dream of a perfect society is the ironic center of Lessing's absorbing new novel: her 24th, published in her 82nd year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAN AND TWO WOMEN by Doris Lessing
Released: Oct. 9, 1963

"Nineteen stories in all, which pinpoint and needle the anxieties, collisions, betrayals of emotional experience in disabused terms."
This is Doris Lessing's first collection of short stories in some time and it is to be hoped that her audience in this country (she has always commanded considerable attention in England) will now, since The Golden Notebook, be more alert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIFTH CHILD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 25, 1988

"But, despite echoes of pop-fiction (Rosemary's Baby, etc.) and TV-movie case-histories (damaged child, valiant mum), the plain story itself—fine-tuned with ordinary-life details yet also insidiously fable-like—is stark, relentless, and memorably harrowing."
Ever unpredictable, Lessing now offers a rather cryptic yet uncommonly accessible tale of psycho-social horror: a variation on the classic "changeling" formula—here marbled, subtly and disturbingly, with such Lessing themes as apocalyptic doom, the rough dignity of society's outcasts, and the dark underside of human nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 11, 1950

"The deadening atmosphere here, the external pressures which combine with inner weaknesses, all blend into a saddening and often compelling portrayal of deterioration."
In monotones, this is a tragic story of emotional immaturity as it retreats to the borderline of madness, effectively projected against the sultry, faded, bleak country of the South African farming country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2006

"It is Lessing's ability to summarize a complex behavior in a sentence rather than the haphazard plot that compels our interest here."
A sequel to Mara and Dann (1999), this book employs a similar terse narrative style, appropriate to people who for centuries have been adrift in a world of primitive technology and thought and violent social structures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER BEFORE THE DARK by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1973

"Who can remain exempt?"
With what tenacity, as well as shattering effectiveness, has Doris Lessing functioned as the cartologist of women in our time scanning their various intellectual, biological and emotional binds ali the way beyond reality. Read full book review >