Search Results: "Doris Lessing"


BOOK REVIEW

MARA AND DANN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"She isn't a stylist, and she takes no prisoners, but this writer remains one of contemporary fiction's genuine thinkers and visionaries, and it would be folly to ignore her."
Lessing's 22nd novel, a dystopian allegory set in "Ifrik" (formerly Africa) thousands of years hence, is a ponderous, hectoring, fascinating second cousin to her Memoirs of a Survivor (1975) and The Four-Gated City (1969) (and quite reminiscent, incidentally, of Norman Mailer's similarly forbidding Ancient Evenings). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HABIT OF LOVING by Doris Lessing
Released: Jan. 1, 1957

"An audience- while deserved- may be difficult to assure."
A collection of short stories, always able and sometimes notable, range from England to Africa to the continent, from lighter sketches to soberer commentaries on beaten, broken lives, and are distinguished by their quietly perspicacious view of human existence and experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Further proof, if it were needed, of Lessing's remarkable ability to look reality in the face and not blink."
Lessing, as this second installment of her autobiography again proves, is one of those rare writers who has lived the examined life and is willing to share what she has learned and done, even if it is not to her credit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARTICULARLY CATS by Doris Lessing
NON-FICTION
Released: May 9, 1967

"Particularly cat lovers."
Novelist Doris Lessing can recall "a hundred incidents involving cats, years and years of cats"—and does so in a memoir that reaches across continents and the years, and extreme feline states. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALFRED AND EMILY by Doris Lessing
Released: Aug. 5, 2008

"At age 89, the author may be slowing down a trifle, but the best parts here are as bracing and engaging as anything she's written in the past 30 years."
In her first post-Nobel book, Lessing (The Cleft, 2007, etc.) imagines what her parents' life—and England—would have been like if World War I had never happened. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHIKASTA by Doris Lessing
Released: Oct. 22, 1979

Lessing's latest project, a series entitled Canopus in Argos—Archives, will (if this first volume is any indication) firmly pull together and extend all the most controversial elements of her recent work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN OF VIOLENCE by Doris Lessing
Released: Nov. 11, 1964

"Her story is a consistently interesting audit of experience, and full of the emotional energy, integrity, and clear if sometimes wrongheaded intelligence which has validated and distinguished earlier books."
Doris Lessing's glittering Golden Notebook (1962) was five books in one; Children of Violence is made up of the first two books of a prospective quintet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 1994

"Refreshingly, not a self-indulgent mea culpa, but a brutally frank examination of how Lessing became what she is — a distinguished writer, a woman who has lived life to the full, and a constant critic of cant."
As is to be expected from Lessing (The Real Thing; 1992, etc.), whose clear and always intelligent no-nonsense writing has explored subjects that transcend the commonplace, this first volume of her autobiography reflects all her remarkable strengths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1972

"The stories have the virtues of their diversity and ease and, on the whole, a gentleness which suggests an accommodation and acceptance one might never have expected."
It is almost ten years since Doris Lessing's last collection of short stories and in this form she is less identifiably herself — there is none of the militance, both personal and political, which has intensified the thrust of her novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRANDMOTHERS by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"When you're dealing with an author whose track record spans a half-century and paradigm-altering works like The Golden Notebook, it's too easy to simply praise another excellent effort. Where is this woman's Nobel Prize?"
Four novellas demonstrating that 84-year-old author (The Sweetest Dream, 2002, etc.) still boasts a range and power few writers half her age can muster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEN, IN THE WORLD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"Isn't it about time this woman received serious Nobel Prize consideration? Few, if any, living writers can have explored so many forbidding fictional worlds with such passion and conviction."
Far from resting on her laurels, Lessing—who has been publishing for 50 years, and goes from strength to strength—offers this bleak monitory sequel to her harrowing The Fifth Child (1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD TERRORIST by Doris Lessing
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 25, 1985

"Altogether, this is a book which is strong as a diagnostic study of political motivation—and stronger still as an uncannily authentic character-study."
In her first signed novel since the mythical Canopus in Argos series, Lessing returns to reality—and to her considerable gifts for social observation and vivid characterization. Read full book review >