Search Results: "Doris Lessing"


BOOK REVIEW

MARA AND DANN by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 1999

"She isn't a stylist, and she takes no prisoners, but this writer remains one of contemporary fiction's genuine thinkers and visionaries, and it would be folly to ignore her."
Lessing's 22nd novel, a dystopian allegory set in "Ifrik" (formerly Africa) thousands of years hence, is a ponderous, hectoring, fascinating second cousin to her Memoirs of a Survivor (1975) and The Four-Gated City (1969) (and quite reminiscent, incidentally, of Norman Mailer's similarly forbidding Ancient Evenings). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLEFT by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2007

"A dark parable, powerful yet baffling."
One of postcolonial fiction's brightest lights makes mythic the battle of the sexes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIFTH CHILD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 25, 1988

"But, despite echoes of pop-fiction (Rosemary's Baby, etc.) and TV-movie case-histories (damaged child, valiant mum), the plain story itself—fine-tuned with ordinary-life details yet also insidiously fable-like—is stark, relentless, and memorably harrowing."
Ever unpredictable, Lessing now offers a rather cryptic yet uncommonly accessible tale of psycho-social horror: a variation on the classic "changeling" formula—here marbled, subtly and disturbingly, with such Lessing themes as apocalyptic doom, the rough dignity of society's outcasts, and the dark underside of human nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAN AND TWO WOMEN by Doris Lessing
Released: Oct. 9, 1963

"Nineteen stories in all, which pinpoint and needle the anxieties, collisions, betrayals of emotional experience in disabused terms."
This is Doris Lessing's first collection of short stories in some time and it is to be hoped that her audience in this country (she has always commanded considerable attention in England) will now, since The Golden Notebook, be more alert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2006

"It is Lessing's ability to summarize a complex behavior in a sentence rather than the haphazard plot that compels our interest here."
A sequel to Mara and Dann (1999), this book employs a similar terse narrative style, appropriate to people who for centuries have been adrift in a world of primitive technology and thought and violent social structures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER BEFORE THE DARK by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1973

"Who can remain exempt?"
With what tenacity, as well as shattering effectiveness, has Doris Lessing functioned as the cartologist of women in our time scanning their various intellectual, biological and emotional binds ali the way beyond reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUR-GATED CITY by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 1969

"But it does have the self-propelled continuity of The Golden Notebook, a kind of flaying, furious, obsessive momentum which should assure much of the same audience."
This is the fifth and last installment of Doris Lessing's Bildungsroman—Children of Violence—which began with Martha Quest, published in England in 1952. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1971

"Perhaps only the primary message of the book that the individual is only a small part of humanity which is in turn only a small part of that grand design."
The briefing, one of a very few fixed points in Miss Lessing's self-styled "inner space fiction," takes place well above the clouds at a conference where Minna Err and Merk Ury (oh dear) decide to send some delegates to Hell, or Earth, to reclaim the planet from aggressiveness and irrationality and "separativeness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1972

"The stories have the virtues of their diversity and ease and, on the whole, a gentleness which suggests an accommodation and acceptance one might never have expected."
It is almost ten years since Doris Lessing's last collection of short stories and in this form she is less identifiably herself — there is none of the militance, both personal and political, which has intensified the thrust of her novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STORIES by Margaret Drabble
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 22, 1978

"An appropriately austere package for the only very occasionally sentimental Mrs. Lessing."
Thirty-five short fictions by the author of The Golden Notebook: principally the entire contents of The Temptation of Jack Orkney and Other Stories (1972) and A Man and Two Women (1963). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRANDMOTHERS by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"When you're dealing with an author whose track record spans a half-century and paradigm-altering works like The Golden Notebook, it's too easy to simply praise another excellent effort. Where is this woman's Nobel Prize?"
Four novellas demonstrating that 84-year-old author (The Sweetest Dream, 2002, etc.) still boasts a range and power few writers half her age can muster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEN, IN THE WORLD by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"Isn't it about time this woman received serious Nobel Prize consideration? Few, if any, living writers can have explored so many forbidding fictional worlds with such passion and conviction."
Far from resting on her laurels, Lessing—who has been publishing for 50 years, and goes from strength to strength—offers this bleak monitory sequel to her harrowing The Fifth Child (1988). Read full book review >