Search Results: "Doris Lessing"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HABIT OF LOVING by Doris Lessing
Released: Jan. 1, 1957

"An audience- while deserved- may be difficult to assure."
A collection of short stories, always able and sometimes notable, range from England to Africa to the continent, from lighter sketches to soberer commentaries on beaten, broken lives, and are distinguished by their quietly perspicacious view of human existence and experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLEFT by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2007

"A dark parable, powerful yet baffling."
One of postcolonial fiction's brightest lights makes mythic the battle of the sexes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 5, 1980

"Demanding and uningratiating, then, but—like previous Canopus volumes—worth the effort of readers attuned to the very biggest questions."
After a digression into sexual politics (The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four, and Five), Lessing's science-fiction cycle returns to the broad sociological preoccupations of Shikasta (1979)—in which we learned of the Canopean Empire's benevolent, triumphant, yet doomed experiments with primates on Colonised Planet 5, Shikasta. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1992

"No warm and fuzzy feelings here, only bracing truths—but then that's what Lessing has always done best."
In a new collection, Lessing (The Fifth Child, 1988, etc.) again demonstrates the formidable intelligence and lucid vision that make her writing so distinctive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 21, 1992

"Always the fair-minded realist, Leasing isn't overly optimistic about the future, but her sympathetic account of Zimbabwe's struggle to forge a common destiny is most worthwhile."
Leasing, once a "Prohibited Immigrant" barred from her childhood homeland of Rhodesia by its white minority government, returns to what is now Zimbabwe—and in inimitably forthright style records her impressions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1971

"Perhaps only the primary message of the book that the individual is only a small part of humanity which is in turn only a small part of that grand design."
The briefing, one of a very few fixed points in Miss Lessing's self-styled "inner space fiction," takes place well above the clouds at a conference where Minna Err and Merk Ury (oh dear) decide to send some delegates to Hell, or Earth, to reclaim the planet from aggressiveness and irrationality and "separativeness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1972

"The stories have the virtues of their diversity and ease and, on the whole, a gentleness which suggests an accommodation and acceptance one might never have expected."
It is almost ten years since Doris Lessing's last collection of short stories and in this form she is less identifiably herself — there is none of the militance, both personal and political, which has intensified the thrust of her novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER BEFORE THE DARK by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1973

"Who can remain exempt?"
With what tenacity, as well as shattering effectiveness, has Doris Lessing functioned as the cartologist of women in our time scanning their various intellectual, biological and emotional binds ali the way beyond reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUR-GATED CITY by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 1969

"But it does have the self-propelled continuity of The Golden Notebook, a kind of flaying, furious, obsessive momentum which should assure much of the same audience."
This is the fifth and last installment of Doris Lessing's Bildungsroman—Children of Violence—which began with Martha Quest, published in England in 1952. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAN AND TWO WOMEN by Doris Lessing
Released: Oct. 9, 1963

"Nineteen stories in all, which pinpoint and needle the anxieties, collisions, betrayals of emotional experience in disabused terms."
This is Doris Lessing's first collection of short stories in some time and it is to be hoped that her audience in this country (she has always commanded considerable attention in England) will now, since The Golden Notebook, be more alert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFRICAN STORIES by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1965

"It is an impressive collection, confirming the stringent sympathies of this writer which consistently represent protest and commitment."
Doris Lessing spent most of her first thirty years in South Africa, the "tough, sunburnt, virile, positive country contemptuous of subtleties and sensibility" described thus on the first page of this 700 page collection of shorter and longer stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 4, 1980

"But there is a sweetness and generosity about this work not quite like anything she has done; like the difficult but moving Shikasta, it seems to encompass and summarize dozens of her previous concerns with a sort of piercing magnanimity."
This brief fable, the second work in the science-fiction series begun with Shikasta (1979), is bound to be read as a return to the portrayals of sexual politics responsible for Lessing's initial vogue. Read full book review >