Search Results: "Doris Naisbitt"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 5, 2010

"An intriguing look at the new China."
An analysis of economic, social and political patterns that attempts to explain the Chinese economic miracle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1999

"Whither, indeed! ($125,000 ad/promo; author tour; radio satellite tour)"
Super trend spotter and premier historian of future events Naisbitt (Megatrends, 1982, etc.) and his co-authors (his daughter and artist Philips) examine trends in nascent technology and find much portentous material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 26, 1994

"Another slick status report on putatively earth-shaking shifts in the increasingly interdependent but fragmenting global economy from a past master of the futurist game."
Naisbitt (Megatrends 2000, etc.) here focuses on an apparent incongruity, if not contradiction, in the Global Village's premillennial, post-cold war order. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW MANY MILES TO BABYLON by Doris Gercke
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"In Hamilton's fluent translation, Gercke reads like a feminist DÅrrenmatt—without his fondness for surprises, but with the same talent for revealing the skeleton beneath the detective-story skin."
Hamburg detective Bella Block, old-pro heroine of five previous novels, makes her English-language debut in this austere fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHIKASTA by Doris Lessing
Released: Oct. 22, 1979

Lessing's latest project, a series entitled Canopus in Argos—Archives, will (if this first volume is any indication) firmly pull together and extend all the most controversial elements of her recent work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 1994

"Refreshingly, not a self-indulgent mea culpa, but a brutally frank examination of how Lessing became what she is — a distinguished writer, a woman who has lived life to the full, and a constant critic of cant."
As is to be expected from Lessing (The Real Thing; 1992, etc.), whose clear and always intelligent no-nonsense writing has explored subjects that transcend the commonplace, this first volume of her autobiography reflects all her remarkable strengths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRISONS WE CHOOSE TO LIVE INSIDE by Doris Lessing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1987

"Lesser Lessing."
Many of Lessing's (Shikasta; The Good Terrorist, etc.) novels have dealt with the particular confusions and complexities of modern life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO SHOULD MELISSA MARRY? by Doris Cassiday
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"But there's no denying that fashion writer Cassiday's moderately interesting son-of-Silhouette romance is easier to take than the telegraphic, wildly formulaic demises of the Robinses."
That publicity-surfing entrepreneur Bill Adler, who created and decimated the Robins family (Who Killed the Robins Family?, 1984, etc.), is at it again, this time with another contest novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 27, 1972

"The stories have the virtues of their diversity and ease and, on the whole, a gentleness which suggests an accommodation and acceptance one might never have expected."
It is almost ten years since Doris Lessing's last collection of short stories and in this form she is less identifiably herself — there is none of the militance, both personal and political, which has intensified the thrust of her novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1971

"Perhaps only the primary message of the book that the individual is only a small part of humanity which is in turn only a small part of that grand design."
The briefing, one of a very few fixed points in Miss Lessing's self-styled "inner space fiction," takes place well above the clouds at a conference where Minna Err and Merk Ury (oh dear) decide to send some delegates to Hell, or Earth, to reclaim the planet from aggressiveness and irrationality and "separativeness." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIFE IN A DAY by Doris Grumbach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 30, 1996

"By reducing her framework—in this case, from a year to a day—Grumbach has produced a pungent essence of a long and flavorful life."
A diary of a day that encapsulates the memories, reflections, and yearnings of a lifetime as gracefully as a FabergÇ egg captures spring sunlight in its tiny interior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIFTY DAYS OF SOLITUDE by Doris Grumbach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 21, 1994

"If Grumbach went to the bottom of her soul during her lonely winter, she does not take the reader with her. (b&w photos, not seen)"
Graceful but essentially unsatisfying reflections on seven weeks spent alone in a house near the Maine coast. Read full book review >