Search Results: "Dorothy Emerling"


BOOK REVIEW

IN THE FOREST by Ann C. Cooper
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1996

"Economical, effective, and charming. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-8)"
Animals—rabbit, salamander, opossum, deer, bobcat, bat, owl, mouse—from the forest ecosystem are briefly described and illustrated in soft color-pencil drawings in this entry in the Wild Wonder series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALONG THE SEASHORE by Ann C. Cooper
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 1997

"Throughout, Cooper invites readers to search back through the pages for details, inspiring careful reinspection of text and art. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-10)"
A handsome and useful beginning guide in the Wild Wonders series, to the plants and animals of the Pacific Coast of North America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 12, 1986

"A knotty confusion of names, places and schemes, but overall an engrossing, often witty portrayal of the early throes of commerce, fleshed out with satisfying characters and complex alliances."
A bumbling lummox turned business superstar in 15th-century Europe is the hero of the first volume of a promised historical series, by the author of several mysteries and the Francis of Lymond novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KITTY AND ME by Dorothy Stott
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Printed on sturdy stock that will stand up to many rereadings. (Picture book. 1-5)"
One of a pair of unusually well-designed and appealing flap books (the other is Puppy and Me, ISBN 0-525-45080-7). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGELS OF THE SWAMP by Dorothy Whittaker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 12, 1991

"Not a deep tale, but pleasantly optimistic and vividly realized. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Two runaways and an older teenager join forces to build new lives—in a sunny first novel set in Depression-era Florida. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OBJECT OF YOUR LOVE by Dorothy Speak
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1998

"Alice Munro would surely approve."
A fine collection of nine edgy, vivid stories, most of which appeared first in Canadian periodicals, by an Ottawa writer who has been hailed as "the new Alice Munro." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH AT DOVECOTE HATCH by Dorothy Cannell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2015

"Agatha Christie meets Downton Abbey in Florence's second case, a charming reminder of all the country house murders of Britain's golden age."
A quiet British village hardly seems the place for a murder, much less two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN! by Dorothy Cannell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"A farcical fairy-tale, written in determinedly Wodehousian style, that overplays its wry tone, silly plot, and likable characters to the point of tedium."
The author's penchant for the absurd (How to Murder the Man of Your Dreams, 1995, etc.) reaches full flower in this off-the-wall take on English aristocracy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO LAUGHING MATTER by Dorothy Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 30, 1993

"The author is coasting in this one—its piddling contrivances, dull characters, and somnolent pace will win no new fans for the usually reliable Inspector, who, it is to be hoped, will be back on track for number 13."
Sturrenden's Inspector Luke Thanet's 12th case (Wake the Dead, etc.) has him investigating the death of vineyard owner Zak Randish, found in his office amid a welter of blood and broken glass. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MATCH FOR A MURDERER by Dorothy Dunnett
Released: June 14, 1971

"Think of it as a rum punch with too much punch or, if you're comparison shopping, it's as mindblown as Joyce Porter's bizarreries."
The third case loosely — how could it be otherwise — supervised by Johnson Johnson in Nassau where there is an attempt to kill a Chief of Intelligence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 7, 1984

"But fans of the frou-frou-style English mystery (modeled on Allingham, not Sayers, Marsh, or Christie) will again find much to enjoy—in the arched-eyebrow dialogue, the glittery international backgrounds, and the undeniable singularity of combative heroine Rita."
Even more than in previous frothy capers, Dunnett's taciturn, super-cool hero Johnson Johnson (portrait-painter/secret-agent) takes a back seat to a quirky female narrator: this time it's punk-haired, tough little Rita Geddes, a Scottish makeup artist—and a protege of Hollywood's legendary, about-to-retire Kim-Jim Curtis. Read full book review >