Search Results: "Doug Mindell"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO DOG by Joyce Sidman
ANIMALS
Released: March 24, 2003

"As a whole, dog lovers will likely lap it up eagerly, budding writers will snuffle it with interest, and teens who combine the two tendencies might even roll ecstatically. (Poetry/essays. 12+)"
This unabashed collection joins Sidman's (Eureka!, not reviewed, etc.) verse with new-to-children's-books Mindell's photographs and essays from teens to celebrate the wonders of all things canine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIGMARES by Cushman Doug
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2012

"Likely to inspire more giggles than gasps; these hammy horrors are sure to please. (Poetry. 8-12)"
Mummy Pigs, Frankenswine and Werehogs…oh my! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CARDBOARD by Doug TenNapel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"Utterly brilliant.(Graphic fantasy. 10 & up)"
An out-of-the-box story of golems, guys and guts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALIFORNIA, THE MAGIC ISLAND by Doug Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"A must in the Golden State; teachers in other states could use it as inspiration for their own mythic histories. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
In the early 16th century, a Spanish romantic adventure book told of Queen Calafia and her magical land, California, where she led black-skinned Amazon women of great courage and wisdom; Hansen plays on this trope in this illustrated tribute that combines history and myth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESCAPE FROM THE LIZZARKS by Doug TenNapel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A promising first offering; now let's see where it goes. (Graphic fantasy. 7-11)"
In a richly imagined amphibian-vs.-reptile world, Herk, a small, but plucky Nnewt, must face the viciously villainous Lizzarks after they destroy all that he holds dear.
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BOOK REVIEW

INSPECTOR HOPPER’S MYSTERY YEAR by Doug Cushman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"Cushman also makes the bug world a pretty appealing place, with its fine colors, merry gesticulations, everyday happenings, and doubtless the only mealy bug in existence that sports luxurious mustachios and a dapper bowler hat. (Easy reader. 4-8)"
Cushman offers a second helping of good, just-this-side-of-goofy stories for beginning readers, featuring Inspector Hopper and McBugg, introduced in Inspector Hopper (2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIRK BONES AND THE MYSTERY OF THE MISSING BONES by Doug Cushman
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2009

"Although informed by horror movies, the illustrations play down potential scariness in favor of humor, making this monster mystery a satisfying, accessible title for new readers. (Early reader. 5-7)"
In this follow-up to Dirk Bones and the Mystery of the Haunted House (2006), the skeleton reporter/detective is on the trail of a missing book by Frankenstein monster-esque writer Edgar Bleek. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIRK BONES AND THE MYSTERY OF THE HAUNTED HOUSE by Doug Cushman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Stay tuned for sequels. (Easy reader. 6-8)"
The creator of Aunt Eater and Inspector Hopper opens a new easy-reader series featuring an even less conventional sleuth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOUSE AND MOLE AND THE YEAR-ROUND GARDEN by Doug Cushman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"A book that promises more than it delivers; still, the sprightly tone and cheery illustrations may arouse interest, and a knowledgeable adult could build on what's outlined here. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The Scientific American imprimatur on this Children's BOMC selection is misleading: the two animal friends' gardening between one spring and the next—planting vegetables, watching them grow, putting things by, enjoying the beach or making a snow mouse as they await the next garden task—makes an effective overview of seasonal activities, but it's marred by inattention to detail. E.g., Mole shows Mouse ``how to plant pea seeds,'' but no specifics are offered; four corn seedlings (in a single row under an apple tree) simply don't resemble corn in the cartoon- style illustrations; and while a substantial number of related facts are offered in boxes at page bottoms (e.g., ``under the garden'' are worms, ants, grubs, and aphids) they tend to be superficial (what is the significance of these underground creatures?). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPACE CAT by Doug Cushman
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2004

"Fans of Commander Toad will sign on happily to this promising start, which features lots of aliens in oogy shapes and colors, a Fritz Lang-ish robot who really needs to be kept out of the kitchen, and an intrepid tiger-striped Lead clad in a nifty spacesuit. (Easy reader. 6-8)"
Working up an idea he claims he had when he was ten, Cushman introduces a resourceful feline space explorer, with a feckless sidekick robot named Earl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INSPECTOR HOPPER by Doug Cushman
ANIMALS
Released: April 30, 2000

"What does charm in these pages is the artwork, with its warm colors, landscapes as seen from insect level, and its atmosphere of adventure, even if it materializes only in the slightest of measures. (Easy reader. 6-8)"
The accent in Cushman's beginning reader is decidedly on the act of reading, as the story itself, broken into three fleeting chapters, has little momentum or interest of its own, let alone the brio or dash any detective story should. Read full book review >