Search Results: "Drew Magary"


BOOK REVIEW

THE POSTMORTAL by Drew Magary
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 30, 2011

"Magary has created a smartly realized vision of a planet that's hit the skids, but it could use more interesting residents."
One man blogs civilization's slow, terrifying decline after a cure for aging is discovered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEONE COULD GET HURT by Drew Magary
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 2013

"An outspoken dad's brassy, wise and painfully honest view from the top of the family tree."
The pride and pitfalls of contemporary fatherhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HIKE by Drew Magary
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"An eerie odyssey that would be right at home in the pages of the pulpy Warren comics."
The second, equally creepy novel from Deadspin columnist Magary (Someone Could Get Hurt, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDREW DREW AND DREW by Barney Saltzberg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Joyful imagination, plain and simple. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An unassuming boy, a single lead pencil and plenty of fresh white space make for a true descendent of Harold and the Purple Crayon, with its own flavor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REHUMANIZED DREW by K.M. Baginski
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 13, 2017

"A rich, complex meditation on love and mortality among supernatural beings."
A fallen angel on the run due to an international conspiracy finds himself in love in this second series installment by Baginski (Windstalker, 2015). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARLES RICHARD DREW, M.D. by Rinna Evelyn Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1991

A ``First Book'' that introduces the pioneer behind the Red Cross Blood Bank. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO DREW CATS by Anushka Ravishankar
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2014

"Storytellers, students of folklore and those who appreciate seeing the work of international children's-book creators will all welcome this intriguing import. (Picture book/folk tale. 5-8)"
This adaptation of an (relatively) oft-told tale features a conversational text paired with illustrations that echo the story's Japanese origins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 27, 2004

"A solid offering that, were it more completely sourced, would be nothing short of tremendous. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-9)"
This winsomely imagined account of an episode when Audubon was 18 years old joins the flocks of commemorative works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO DREW CATS by Arthur A. Levine
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"It's not an improvement on Hearn's graceful simplicity, but it's a likable update, striking a good balance between contemporary warmth and accessibility and respect for the earlier version. (Folklore/Picture book. 5+)"
A competent adaptation of a legend about a frail boy whose farm family takes him to a monastery to train as a priest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TAMING OF THE DREW by Stephanie Kate Strohm
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 5, 2016

"Lighthearted and fluffy, this is both a wonderful immersion in Shakespeare and a great beach book. (Fiction. 14-18)"
What do Shakespeare, Clueless, and Punk'd have in common? This novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PICTURE THAT MOM DREW by Kathy Mallat
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1997

"Children will enjoy the surprise of seeing close-up forms, shapes, and textures become a larger whole when the picture is unveiled in the final spread, and learn something about looking at art in the process. (glossary) (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
While many a beginning concept book focuses solely on colors or shapes, this picture-book collaboration of a newcomer and a veteran introduces young viewers to additional elements of art, including lines, forms, shades, patterns, and textures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREW THE SCREW by Mattia Cerato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Words like 'measures' might be challenging for this first reader, but for the most part, Cerato brings the coolness of working in the toolshed to life. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An anthropomorphic screw introduces readers to the tools in his shed then suffers a modest existential crisis before he learns his own raison d'être. Read full book review >