Search Results: "E. Thomas Wood"


BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"The end result ought to be risible, but Jarvis pulls it off, to stunning effect. (Horror. 10-14)"
A rousing tale of horror and heroism, this last prequel to the Deptford Mice trilogy stands well alone, as the doughty shipmouse Thomas Triton at last reveals his tragic past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 23, 2006

"A bit much for some readers, but certain to please the legions of woodworking aficionados."
A fact-filled celebration of wood in human history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 21, 1994

"Shallow, but exciting all the same. (8 pages of photos, not seen)"
A lively, albeit not very scholarly, account of Jan Karski's role in the WW II Polish underground. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-MAIL by Stephanie D. Fletcher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Long, bland stretches alternate with vulgar, hyperexplicit sexual confessions: a cheap, easy, and convincing glimpse of modern American cybersex—for what that may be worth."
Non-initiates to the communications revolution can now enjoy cyber-romance on the printed page—thanks to this epistolary first novel by a North Carolina writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANT WOOD by R. Tripp Evans
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2010

"An overly analytical biography, but one that goes a long way toward upending assumptions about Wood's work."
A portrait of painter Grant Wood (1891-1942) as a melancholy, closeted man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 12, 2009

"A perfectly paced, beautifully crafted and moving end to a memorable fantasy. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
In this finale to the Touchstone Trilogy, past and present magically converge when 12-year-old Midge completes the work begun by her great-great aunt Celandine decades before to rescue five ancient tribes of little people hiding from the human world in the woods of Mill Farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVER'S WOOD by Sue Hendra
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 1996

"Gouache illustrations look much like linoleum prints—blocks of bright colors, mainly blue and ocher— and the chubby animals, with their bulging white eyes, are undeniably friendly territory. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Oliver, an owl, stays up past his bedtime at the end of one night and sees something he has never seen before—the sun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-I-E-I-O by Judy Sierra
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 25, 2014

"Sierra's upbeat look at small-scale local farming, fulsomely fertilized by Myers, yields a harvest of good fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In this rhymed caper, Old MacDonald has a house—and a high-maintenance lawn that's ripe for change. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E I E I O by Gus Clarke
adapted by Gus Clarke, illustrated by Gus Clarke
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Good fun. (Folklore/Picture book. 2-7)"
Any new edition of ``Old MacDonald'' needs a compelling novelty to justify its existence; here, the author-illustrator of Eddie and Teddy (1991) comes up with an elaborate scheme of incorporating the animals' ``quacks,'' ``moos,'' etc., in cartoon-style balloons that are cleverly integrated into the text on the verso pages where they are first introduced; on the rectos, the animals assemble in their increasing numbers to issue a comical cacophony for new readers to sort out. Read full book review >