Search Results: "E.B. Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS by A. Barsell Carlyle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 23, 2009

"An enjoyable beach read for men, but suspense lags until the final pages."
A debut novel of men's fiction/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E.B. WHITE by Janice Tingum
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"The book survives this flaw, however, perhaps because Tingum keeps analysis to a minimum; White's life unfolds not according to any premise that she must prove, but simply as he lived it. (notes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 10+)"
A modest biography of a modest writer, with black-and-white photographs on every other page. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E.B. WHITE by Beverly Gherman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 30, 1992

"B&w photos and index not seen. (Biography. 9-13)"
An adequate survey of the life of ``the shy young man, the lonely college student, the fearful public speaker, the insecure writer'' whose oeuvre included The New Yorker's ``Talk of the Town'' and the delectably funny tag lines after its newsbreaks, several volumes of wise and witty essays, expertly cadenced verse, and The Elements of Style (bible of all true writers), as well as his beloved children's classics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS LITTLE LIGHT OF MINE by E.B. Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"The musical score is included. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The well-known African-American spiritual serves as the text for this evocative interpretation, looking at one boy's cheerful personality as a shining light in his own neighborhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 6, 2014

"The richness of this book's words and images will inspire readers to learn more about this holiday that never should have been necessary…but was. (Web resources, glossary) (Picture book. 5-9)"
Johnson tells a tale of Juneteenth in Texas through the eyes of a child, while Lewis' earth-toned watercolor illustrations capture the quotidian aspects of the way of life emancipation ended. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARS ABOVE US by Geoffrey Norman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"A flawed but welcome addition to the sparse cadre of trade titles on this topic. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Norman's first picture book explores a child's fear of the dark as a manifestation of, and metaphor for, acute separation anxiety. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EACH KINDNESS by Jacqueline Woodson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"Something of the flipside to the team's The Other Side (2001), this is a great book for teaching kindness. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Woodson and Lewis' latest collaboration unfolds with harsh beauty and the ominousness of opportunities lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"An excellent way to teach history, this belongs in every library. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-9)"
Based on a true story the author came across while writing the historical-fiction novel Stealing Freedom (1998), this beautifully illustrated picture book tells of the attempt of a young slave boy to escape his situation and go north. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANITRA BROWN, CLASS CLOWN by Nikki Grimes
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"A charmer. (Picture book/poetry. 8-10)"
Danitra Brown is back and so is her friend Zuri. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OTHER SIDE by Jacqueline Woodson
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Award-winning Lewis's lovely realistic watercolor paintings allow readers to be quiet observers viewing the issue from both sides. (Picture book. 5+)"
Race relations, a complex issue, is addressed in a simple manner through the eyes of two young girls, one black and one white, on either side of a fence that divides their yards and, in fact, the town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATIVITY by John Steptoe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 17, 1997

"Lewis's full-spread watercolors under a readable text happily complement this warm story of friendship. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A posthumously published story by Steptoe (Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters, 1987, etc.) demonstrates his usual themes of positive self-image and acceptance of cultural heritage, this time presenting young African-American Charles's reaction when "this new dude walks in" to Mr. Cohen's classroom. Read full book review >